Cover image.

Transportation Improvement Program
Federal Fiscal Year 2022

Boston Region MPO

Draft, April 29, 2021

Contents

Executive Summary
Chapter 1: 3C Transportation Planning and the Boston Region MPO
Chapter 2: About the Unified Planning Work Program
Chapter 3: Certification Requirements
Chapter 4: Boston Region MPO Planning Studies and Technical Analyses
Chapter 5: Agency and Other Client-Funded Transportation Planning Studies and Technical Analyses
Chapter 6: Resource Management and Support Activities
Chapter 7: Metropolitan Area Planning Council (MAPC) Activities
Chapter 8: Boston Region MPO Budget and Operating Summaries

Appendices

Abbreviations

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 


Prepared by
The Central Transportation Planning Staff:
Staff to the Boston Region Metropolitan Planning Organization

Directed by the Boston Region Metropolitan Planning Organization,
which is composed of the

Massachusetts Department of Transportation
Metropolitan Area Planning Council
Massachusetts Bay Transportation Authority
MBTA Advisory Board
Massachusetts Port Authority
Regional Transportation Advisory Council
City of Boston
City of Beverly
City of Everett
City of Framingham
City of Newton
City of Somerville
City of Woburn
Town of Arlington
Town of Acton
Town of Rockland
Town of Lexington
Town of Medway
Town of Norwood
Federal Highway Administration (nonvoting)
Federal Transit Administration (nonvoting)


Map of the MPO.

NOTICE OF NONDISCRIMINATION RIGHTS AND PROTECTIONS

Meeting locations are accessible to people with disabilities and are near public transportation. Upon request (preferably two weeks in advance of the meeting), every effort will be made to provide accommodations such as assistive listening devices, materials in accessible formats and in languages other than English, and interpreters in American Sign Language and other languages. Please contact the MPO staff at 857.702.3700 (voice), 617.570.9193 (TTY), 617.570.9192 (fax), or eharvey@ctps.org.

The Boston Region Metropolitan Planning Organization (MPO) operates its programs, services, and activities in compliance with federal nondiscrimination laws including Title VI of the Civil Rights Act of 1964 (Title VI), the Civil Rights Restoration Act of 1987, and related statutes and regulations. Title VI prohibits discrimination in federally assisted programs and requires that no person in the United States of America shall, on the grounds of race, color, or national origin (including limited English proficiency), be excluded from participation in, denied the benefits of, or be otherwise subjected to discrimination under any program or activity that receives federal assistance. Related federal nondiscrimination laws administered by the Federal Highway Administration, Federal Transit Administration, or both, prohibit discrimination on the basis of age, sex, and disability. The Boston Region MPO considers these protected populations in its Title VI Programs, consistent with federal interpretation and administration. In addition, the Boston Region MPO provides meaningful access to its programs, services, and activities to individuals with limited English proficiency, in compliance with U.S. Department of Transportation policy and guidance on federal Executive Order 13166.

The Boston Region MPO also complies with the Massachusetts Public Accommodation Law, M.G.L. c 272 sections 92a, 98, 98a, which prohibits making any distinction, discrimination, or restriction in admission to, or treatment in a place of public accommodation based on race, color, religious creed, national origin, sex, sexual orientation, disability, or ancestry. Likewise, the Boston Region MPO complies with the Governor's Executive Order 526, section 4, which requires that all programs, activities, and services provided, performed, licensed, chartered, funded, regulated, or contracted for by the state shall be conducted without unlawful discrimination based on race, color, age, gender, ethnicity, sexual orientation, gender identity or expression, religion, creed, ancestry, national origin, disability, veteran's status (including Vietnam-era veterans), or background.

A complaint form and additional information can be obtained by contacting the MPO or at http://www.bostonmpo.org/mpo_non_discrimination. To request this information in a different language or in an accessible format, please contact

Title VI Specialist
Boston Region MPO
10 Park Plaza, Suite 2150
Boston, MA 02116
civilrights@ctps.org

By Telephone:
857.702.3702 (voice)
For people with hearing or speaking difficulties, connect through the state MassRelay service:
Relay Using TTY or Hearing Carry-over: 800.439.2370
Relay Using Voice Carry-over: 866.887.6619
Relay Using Text to Speech: 866.645.9870

For more information, including numbers for Spanish speakers, visit https://www.mass.gov/massrelay

 

 



Contact MPO staff:

By mail:

Boston Region MPO

Certification Activities Group, Central Transportation Planning Staff

10 Park Plaza, Suite 2150

Boston, MA 02116

By telephone:

857.702.3702 (voice)

For people with hearing or speaking difficulties, connect through the state MassRelay service:

Relay Using TTY or Hearing Carry-over: 800.439.2370

Relay Using Voice Carry-over: 866.887.6619

Relay Using Text to Speech: 866.645.9870

For more information, including numbers for Spanish speakers,
visit
https://www.mass.gov/massrelay

By fax:

617.570.9192

By email:

mgenova@ctps.org

 

This document was funded in part through grants from the Federal Highway Administration and Federal Transit Administration of the U.S. Department of Transportation. Its contents do not necessarily reflect the official views or policies of the U.S. Department of Transportation.

 

 


[LETTER]


 

Abbreviations

 

Abbreviation

Term

3C

continuous, comprehensive, cooperative [metropolitan transportation planning process]

A&F

Administration and Finance Committee

AADT

average annual daily traffic

ACS

American Community Survey [US Census Bureau data]

ADA

Americans with Disabilities Act of 1990

AFC

automated fare collection

BRT

bus rapid transit

BTD

Boston Transportation Department

CA/T

Central Artery/Tunnel [project also known as “the Big Dig”]

CAA

Clean Air Act

CAAA

Clean Air Act Amendments

CATA

Cape Ann Transportation Authority

CECP

Massachusetts Clean Energy and Climate Plan

CFR

Code of Federal Regulations

CIP

Capital Investment Plan [MassDOT]

CMAQ

Congestion Mitigation and Air Quality [federal funding program]

CMR

Code of Massachusetts Regulations

CMP

Congestion Management Process

CO

carbon monoxide

CO2

carbon dioxide

CTPS

Central Transportation Planning Staff

CY

calendar year

DCR

Department of Conservation and Recreation

DEIR

draft environmental impact report

DEP

Department of Environmental Protection [Massachusetts]

DOT

department of transportation

EDTTT

excessive delay threshold travel time

EJ

environmental justice

ENF

environmental notification form

EO

executive order

EOEEA

Massachusetts Executive Office of Energy and Environmental Affairs

EOHED

Massachusetts Executive Office of Housing and Economic Development

EPA

Environmental Protection Agency [federal]

EPDO

equivalent property damage only [a traffic-related index]

FARS

Fatality Analysis and Reporting System [FHWA]

FAST Act

Fixing America’s Surface Transportation Act

FDR

functional design report

FEIR

final environmental impact report

FFGA

full funding grant agreement

FFY

federal fiscal year

FHWA

Federal Highway Administration

FMCB

MBTA Fiscal and Management Control Board

FR

Federal Register

FTA

Federal Transit Administration

GANS

grant anticipation notes [municipal bond financing]

GHG

greenhouse gas

GWSA

Global Warming Solutions Act of 2008 [Massachusetts]

HOV

high-occupancy vehicle

HSIP

Highway Safety Improvement Program [federal funding program]

ICC

Inner Core Committee [MAPC municipal subregion]

IRI

International Roughness Index

ITS

intelligent transportation systems

LED

light-emitting diode

LEP

limited English proficiency

LOTTR

level of travel time ratio

LRTP

Long-Range Transportation Plan [MPO certification document]

MAGIC

Minuteman Advisory Group on Interlocal Coordination [MAPC municipal subregion]

MAP-21

Moving Ahead for Progress in the 21st Century Act

MAPC

Metropolitan Area Planning Council

MARPA

Massachusetts Association of Regional Planning Agencies

MassDOT

Massachusetts Department of Transportation

Massport

Massachusetts Port Authority

MBTA

Massachusetts Bay Transportation Authority

MCCA

Massachusetts Convention Center Authority

MEPA

Massachusetts Environmental Policy Act

MGL

Massachusetts General Laws

MOVES

Motor Vehicle Emissions Simulator [EPA air quality model]

MPO

metropolitan planning organization [Boston Region MPO]

MOU

memorandum of understanding

MWRC

MetroWest Regional Collaborative [MAPC municipal subregion]

MWRTA

MetroWest Regional Transit Authority

NAAQS

National Ambient Air Quality Standards

NH DOT

New Hampshire Department of Transportation

NHFP

National Highway Freight Program

NHPP

National Highway Performance Program

NHS

National Highway System

NHTSA

National Highway Traffic Safety Administration

NMCOG

Northern Middlesex Council of Governments

NOx

nitrogen oxides

NPMRDS

National Performance Measure Research Data Set [FHWA]

NSPC

North Suburban Planning Council [MAPC municipal subregion]

NSTF

North Shore Task Force [MAPC municipal subregion]

NTD

National Transit Database

OTP

MassDOT Office of Transportation Planning

PBPP

performance-based planning and programming

PHED

peak hours of excessive delay

PfP

Planning for Performance

PL

metropolitan planning funds [FHWA] or public law funds

PMT

Program for Mass Transportation [MBTA]

ppm

parts per million

PRC

Project Review Committee [MassDOT]

PSAC

Project Selection Advisory Council [MassDOT]

PSI

Pavement Serviceability Index

PTASP

Public Transportation Agency Safety Plan

RMV

Registry of Motor Vehicles [MassDOT division]

RTA

regional transit authority

RTAC

Regional Transportation Advisory Council [of the Boston Region MPO]

SAFETEA-LU

Safe, Accountable, Flexible, Efficient Transportation Equity Act: A Legacy for Users

SEIR

Single Environmental Impact Report [MEPA]

SFY

state fiscal year

SHSP

Strategic Highway Safety Plan

SIP

State Implementation Plan

SOV

single-occupant vehicle

SPR

Statewide Planning and Research

SRTS

Safe Routes to School [federal program]

SSC

South Shore Coalition [MAPC municipal subregion]

STBGP

Surface Transportation Block Grant Program [federal funding program; replaced STP]

STIP

State Transportation Improvement Program

STP

Surface Transportation Program [federal funding program; replaced by STBGP]

SWAP

South West Advisory Planning Committee [MAPC municipal subregion]

TAM

Transit Asset Management Plan

TAMP

Transportation Asset Management Plan

TAP

Transportation Alternatives Program [federal funding program]

TCM

transportation control measure

TE

transportation equity

TERM

Transit Economic Requirements Model [FTA]

TIP

Transportation Improvement Program [MPO certification document]

TRIC

Three Rivers Interlocal Council [MAPC municipal subregion]

TTI

travel time index

TTTR

Truck Travel Time Reliability Index

ULB

Useful Life Benchmark

UPWP

Unified Planning Work Program [MPO certification document]

USC

United States Code

USDOT

United States Department of Transportation [oversees FHWA and FTA]

UZA

urbanized area

VMT

vehicle-miles traveled

VOCs

volatile organic compounds [pollutants]

VRM

vehicle revenue-miles

WMM

weMove Massachusetts [MassDOT planning initiative]

YMM

youMove Massachusetts [MassDOT planning initiative]

 

 

 

 

Executive Summary

introduction

The Boston Region Metropolitan Planning Organization’s (MPO) five-year capital investment plan, the Federal Fiscal Years (FFYs) 2022–26 Transportation Improvement Program (TIP), is the near-term investment program for the region’s transportation system. Guided by the Boston Region MPO’s vision, goals, and objectives, the TIP prioritizes investments that preserve the current transportation system in a state of good repair, provide safe transportation for all modes, enhance livability, promote equity and sustainability, and improve mobility throughout the region. These investments fund arterial roadway and intersection improvements, maintenance and expansion of the public transit system, bicycle path construction, infrastructure improvements for pedestrians, and major highway reconstruction.

The Boston Region MPO is guided by a 22-member board with representatives of state agencies, regional organizations, and municipalities. Its jurisdiction extends roughly from Boston north to Ipswich, south to Marshfield, and west to municipalities along Interstate 495. Each year, the MPO conducts a process to decide how to spend federal transportation funds for capital projects. The Central Transportation Planning Staff (CTPS), which is the staff to the MPO, manages the TIP development process.

MPO staff coordinates the evaluation of project funding requests, proposes programming of current and new projects based on anticipated funding levels, supports the MPO board in developing a draft TIP document, and facilitates a public review of the draft before the MPO board endorses the final document.

ffys 2022–26 tip investments

The complete TIP program is available in Chapter 3 of this document and online at bostonmpo.org/tip. The TIP tables provide details of how funding is allocated to each programmed project and capital investment program. These tables are organized by federal fiscal year, and are grouped by highway and transit programs.

Highway Program

The Highway Program of the TIP funds the priority transportation projects advanced by the Massachusetts Department of Transportation (MassDOT) and the cities and towns within the Boston region. The program is devoted primarily to preserving and modernizing the existing roadway network by reconstructing arterial roadways, resurfacing highways, and replacing bridges.

In Massachusetts, Federal-Aid Highway Program funding is apportioned by MassDOT, which allocates funding to Grant Anticipation Notes (GANs) payments, various statewide programs, and Regional Targets for the state’s MPOs. In the FFYs 2022–26 TIP, roadway, bridge, and bicycle and pedestrian programs account for more than $1.2 billion in funding to the Boston region. The Regional Target funding provided to the MPOs may be programmed for projects at the discretion of each MPO, whereas MassDOT has discretion to propose its recommended projects for statewide programs, such as those related to bridge repairs and interstate highway maintenance.

Transit Program

The Transit Program of the TIP provides funding for projects and programs that address the capital needs prioritized by the three transit authorities in the region: the Massachusetts Bay Transportation Authority (MBTA), the Cape Ann Transportation Authority (CATA), and the MetroWest Regional Transit Authority (MWRTA). The Transit Program is predominantly dedicated to achieving and maintaining a state of good repair for all assets throughout the transit system.

The FFYs 2022–26 TIP includes nearly $3.6 billion in transit investments by the transit authorities that will support state of good repair, modernize transit systems, and increase access to transit. The Green Line Extension project is a major project programmed in this TIP that will expand transit service. Additionally, beginning in FFY 2025, the MPO will allocate five percent of its annual Regional Target funds to its new Transit Modernization investment program. This program aims to build on the investments made through the Transit Program by using a portion of Highway Program funding to fulfill unmet transit project needs in the region.

regional target program details

During FFYs 2022–26, the Boston Region MPO plans to fund 45 projects with its Regional Target funding. In total, nine new projects were added to the MPO’s Regional Target program during this TIP cycle, all of which were funded through the MPO’s Community Connections Program. Two additional fiscal years of funding were also added for one project already programmed by the MPO, the Newton Microtransit Service project. Details on these projects are available in table ES-1.

 

Table ES-1
New Regional Target Projects Funded in the FFYs 2022–26 TIP

Project Name

Municipality (Proponent)

FFYs of Funding

Regional Target Dollars Programmed

Royall Street Shuttle

Canton

2022-24

$534,820

Newton Microtransit Service

Newton

2023-24*

$427,000

BlueBikes Expansion

Arlington, Newton, and Watertown

2022

$340,000

Alewife Wayfinding Improvements

Cambridge (128 Business Council)

2022

$292,280

Systemwide Bike Racks

MBTA

2022

$275,740

BlueBikes Expansion

Malden and Medford

2022

$236,830

Main Street Transit Signal Priority

Everett and Malden (MBTA)

2022

$225,000

Bicycle Infrastructure

Wellesley

2022

$85,054

Transit App Education Program

Brookline

2022

$43,620

Acton Parking Management System

Acton

2022

$20,000

Total

N/A

N/A

$2,480,344

Note: All projects in this table are funded through the MPO’s Community Connections Program.

*The first FFY of funding for the Newton Microtransit Service project is in FFY 2021, in which $300,000 was allocated to the project.

Source: Boston Region MPO.

Other investment decisions made this year include the allocation of more than $10 million in new funding in FFY 2026 to the Reconstruction of Rutherford Avenue in Boston. FFY 2026 is the fourth year of a five-year funding commitment made by the MPO to this project, which is expected to be completed in FFY 2027. The MPO also set aside continued funding for its Community Connections Program (in FFYs 2023–27) and allocated a second year of funding to its Transit Modernization Program in FFY 2026 (in addition to the funds already reserved in FFY 2025). The funding set aside through both of these programs will be allocated to specific projects during future TIP programming cycles.

During the development of the FFYs 2022–26 TIP, the MPO was very limited in its financial capacity to fund new projects. In addition to the inherently constrained nature of transportation infrastructure funding, the need for which greatly exceeds available resources in any given year, significant cost increases for many projects already programmed in FFYs 2021–25 consumed funding for prospective new projects in FFY 2026. Though this challenge inevitably arises to some extent during every TIP cycle, both this year and last year’s FFYs 2021–25 TIP cycle saw especially severe levels of cost increases. This dynamic drove decision making during this fiscal year and led to no new projects being selected for programming in the FFYs 2022–26 TIP except the $2.5 million in Community Connections projects listed above in Table ES-1.

The MPO’s long-time practice has been to fully fund cost increases for projects already programmed in the TIP. This practice provides certainty for project proponents that the investments they make in project design and permitting will lead to capital funding to support the completion of their project. Given the severity of project cost increases in sequential TIP cycles, however, the MPO has formed a subcommittee of board members to examine the issue further and assess whether changes to this policy—or any of the MPO’s other programming policies outlined in this TIP—are warranted. This subcommittee intends to conduct this work during the summer of 2021, with the intent of providing policy change recommendations to the MPO board for adoption prior to the beginning of the FFYs 2023–27 TIP cycle in the fall of 2021.

Figure ES-1 shows how the Regional Target funding for FFYs 2022–26 is distributed across the MPO’s investment programs. As the chart shows, the Boston Region MPO’s Regional Target Program is devoted primarily to enhancing mobility and safety for all travel modes through significant investments in Complete Streets projects. A large portion of the MPO’s funding also supports the modernization of key regional roadways and expansion of transit infrastructure through investments in Major Infrastructure projects. The MPO also elected to leave approximately $20.5 million unprogrammed, preferring that the use of these funds be determined after the conclusion of the policy dialogue discussed above.

Figure ES-1
FFYs 2022–26 TIP Regional Target Funding by MPO Investment Program

In addition to the distribution of funding across the MPO’s investment programs listed above, Table ES-2 further details the number of projects and the allocation of funds across each program in the FFYs 2022–26 TIP. As noted in Figure ES-1, the MPO has programmed more than 96 percent of its available funding over five years. More details about every project funded through the MPO’s Regional Target program are available in Chapter 3.

Table ES-2
FFYs 2022–26 Boston Region MPO Regional Target Investment Summary

MPO Investment Program

Number of Projects

Regional Target Dollars Programmed

Bicycle Network and Pedestrian Connections

4

$33,704,014

Community Connections (allocated to projects)

10

$2,480,344

Community Connections (not yet allocated to projects)

N/A

$7,522,281

Complete Streets

19

$220,955,609

Intersection Improvements

8

$62,805,302

Major Infrastructure—Flex to Transit1

1

$27,116,883

Major Infrastructure—Roadway2

3

$152,977,631

Transit Modernization (not yet allocated to projects)

N/A

$11,000,000

Unprogrammed

N/A

$20,496,035

Total

45

$539,058,099

Note: Funding amounts in this table include both federal and non-federal funds, including matching funds.

1 The MPO will flex federal highway improvement dollars to support the Green Line Extension.

2 In FFY 2022, the MPO will contribute $11,046,213 to Project 606476—Summer Tunnel Improvements—and MassDOT will contribute other funds. This project is included in the total number of projects in this category.

Source: Boston Region MPO.

When making decisions about which projects to fund, the MPO considers not only the relative distribution of funds across projects and investment programs, but also how the allocation of funds to each investment program compares to the funding goals outlined in the MPO’s Long-Range Transportation Plan (LRTP), Destination 2040. The investment program sizes set forth in the LRTP reflect the types of projects the MPO seeks to fund to help it achieve its goals and objectives for the region, from enhancing safety for all users to promoting mobility and accessibility across the region. More information on the MPO’s goals and objectives are available in Chapter 1, and a comparison between LRTP investment program sizes and program funding levels in the FFYs 2022–26 TIP is shown in Figure ES-2.

Figure ES-2

FFYs 2022–26 TIP: Regional Target Funding Levels Relative to LRTP Investment Program Goals

 

LRTP = Long-Range Transportation Plan. TIP = Transportation Improvement Program.

Source: Boston Region MPO.

The investments made in the FFYs 2022–26 TIP will be implemented in 37 cities and towns throughout the Boston region, ranging from dense inner core communities to developing suburbs further from the urban center. Figure ES-3 illustrates the distribution of Regional Target funding among the eight subregions within the Boston Region MPO’s jurisdiction, as defined by the Metropolitan Area Planning Council (MAPC). This figure also includes information about how the distribution of funds compares to key metrics for measuring the need for funding by subregion, including the percent of regional population, employment, and Federal-Aid roadway miles within each subregion.

 

Figure ES-3
FFYs 2022-26 TIP: Regional Target Funding Levels Relative to Key Indicators


Note: Unprogrammed funds and funds held for the MPO’s Transit Modernization and Community Connections Programs are not included in this figure. Funds allocated to the MBTA’s Systemwide Bicycle Rack project ($275,740 in FFY 2022) are also not included, as these funds will be distributed regionwide.

Source: Boston Region MPO.

Additional information on the geographic distribution of Regional Target funding across the region, including a breakdown of historical funding by municipality, is included in Appendix D.

financing the ffys 2022–26 tip

Highway Program

The TIP Highway Program was developed with the assumption that federal funding for the state would range between $668 million and $721 million annually over the next five years. These amounts include the funds that would be set aside initially by MassDOT as payments for the Accelerated Bridge Program and exclude required matching funds.

The process of deciding how to use this federal funding in the Boston region follows several steps. First, MassDOT reserves funding for GANs debt service payments for the Accelerated Bridge Program; annual GANs payments range between $86 million and $134 million annually over the five years of this TIP.

The remaining Federal-Aid Highway Program funds are budgeted to support state and regional (i.e., MPO) priorities. In this planning cycle, $726 million to $750 million annually was available for programming statewide, including both federal dollars and the local match. MassDOT customarily provides the local match (which can also be provided by other entities); thus, projects are typically funded with 80 percent federal dollars and 20 percent state dollars, depending on the funding program.

Next, MassDOT allocates funding across the following funding categories:

Finally, once these needs have been satisfied, MassDOT allocates the remaining funding among the state’s 13 MPOs for programming. This discretionary funding for MPOs is sub-allocated by formula to determine the Regional Target amounts. The Boston Region MPO receives the largest portion of MPO funding in the state, with approximately 43 percent of Massachusetts’ Regional Target funds allocated to the region. MassDOT develops these targets in consultation with the Massachusetts Association of Regional Planning Agencies (MARPA). This TIP was programmed with the assumption that the Boston Region MPO will have between $105 million and $110 million annually for Regional Target amounts, which consist of federal funding and state funding for the local match.

Each MPO may decide how to prioritize its Regional Target funding. Given that the Regional Target funding is a subset of the Highway Program, the MPO typically programs the majority of funding for roadway projects; however, the MPO has flexed portions of its highway funding to the Transit Program for transit expansion projects and through its Transit Modernization and Community Connections Programs. The TIP Highway Program details the projects that will receive Regional Target funding from the Boston Region MPO and statewide infrastructure projects within the Boston region. Details on these investments are outlined in Chapter 3.

Transit Program

The Federal Transit Administration (FTA) allocates the funds programmed in the TIP Transit Program according to formula. The three regional transit authorities in the Boston Region MPO area that are recipients of these funds are the MBTA, CATA, and MWRTA. The MBTA, with its extensive transit program and infrastructure, is the recipient of the preponderance of the region’s federal transit funds.

Under the federal transportation legislation, Fixing America’s Surface Transportation (FAST) Act, funding is allocated by the following categories:

the tip development process

Overview

When determining which projects to fund through the Regional Target funding process, MPO members collaborate with municipalities, state agencies, members of the public, advocacy groups, and other stakeholders. The MPO board uses evaluation criteria in its project selection process to help identify and prioritize projects that advance progress on the MPO’s six goal areas:

Additionally, the MPO has established investment programs, which are designed to direct Regional Target funding towards MPO priority areas over the next 20 years, to help meet these goals. The investment programs are as follows:

Projects that the MPO selects to receive Regional Target funding through the TIP development process are included in one of the six investment programs listed above. More information on the MPO’s investment programs is available in Chapter 2.

In recent years, the MPO has been incorporating performance-based planning and programming (PBPP) practices into its TIP development and other processes. These practices are designed to help direct MPO funds towards achieving specific outcomes for the transportation system. The MPO’s goals and investment programs are key components of its PBPP framework. In FFY 2018, the MPO began to set targets for specific performance measures. Over time, the MPO will more closely link its performance targets, investment decisions, and monitoring and evaluation activities. More information on PBPP is available in Chapter 4 as well as in Appendix A (Table A-2).

Outreach and Data Collection

The outreach process begins early in the federal fiscal year, when cities and towns designate TIP contacts and begin developing a list of priority projects to be considered for federal funding, and the MPO staff asks the staffs of cities and towns in the region to identify their priority projects. MPO staff compiles the project funding requests into a Universe of Projects, a list of all Bicycle Network and Pedestrian Connections, Complete Streets, Intersection Improvements, and Major Infrastructure projects identified as potential candidates to receive funding through the TIP. Projects seeking funding through the MPO’s Community Connections Program are not included in the Universe, as all projects that apply for this program’s discrete application process are considered for funding. The Universe include projects at varying levels of readiness, from those with significant engineering and design work complete to those still early in the conceptual or planning stage. MPO staff collects data on each project in the Universe so that the projects may be evaluated.

Project Evaluation

MPO staff evaluates projects based on how well they address the MPO’s goals. For MPO staff to conduct a complete project evaluation, Bicycle Network and Pedestrian Connections, Complete Streets, Intersection Improvements, and Major Infrastructure projects must have a functional design report or the project plans must include the level of detail defined in a functional design report, a threshold typically reached when a project nears the 25 percent design stage. To complete an evaluation for projects under consideration through the MPO’s Community Connections Program, project proponents must submit a completed application to MPO staff.

The evaluation results for all projects are presented to the MPO board members for their consideration for programming in the TIP. Draft scores are shared directly with project proponents, at which point proponents are encouraged to review the scores and provide feedback so that MPO staff may make any warranted adjustments to arrive at accurate final results. Once proponents review their scores, final scoring results are posted on the MPO’s website where MPO members, municipal officials, and members of the public may review them.

TIP Readiness Day

An important step toward TIP programming takes place midway through the TIP development cycle at a meeting—referred to as TIP Readiness Day—that both MassDOT and MPO staff attend. At this meeting, MassDOT project managers provide updates about cost and schedule changes related to currently programmed projects. These cost and schedule changes must be taken into account as MPO staff helps the MPO board consider updates to the already programmed years of the TIP, as well as the addition of new projects in the outermost year of the TIP.

Staff Recommendation and Draft TIP

Using the evaluation results and information about project readiness (that is, the extent to which a project is fully designed and ready for construction), MPO staff prepares a recommendation or a series of programming scenarios for how to program the Regional Target funding in the TIP. Other considerations, such as whether a project was included in the LRTP, addresses an identified transportation need, or promotes distribution of transportation investments across the region, are also incorporated into these programming scenarios. The staff recommendation is always financially constrained—meaning, subject to available funding. There was approximately $539 million of Regional Target funding available to the Boston Region MPO for FFYs 2022–26. In this TIP cycle, the MPO board members discussed several scenarios for the Regional Target Program for highway projects and selected a preferred program in April 2021.

In addition to prioritizing the Regional Target funding, the MPO board reviews and endorses the statewide highway program that MassDOT recommends for programming. The board also reviews and endorses programming of funds for the MBTA’s, CATA’s, and MWRTA’s transit capital programs.

Approving the TIP

After selecting a preferred programming scenario, usually in late March, the MPO board votes to release the draft TIP for a 21-day public review period. The comment period typically begins in late April or early May, and during this time the MPO invites members of the public, municipal officials, and other stakeholders in the Boston region to review the proposed program and submit feedback. During the public review period, MPO staff hosts public meetings to discuss the draft TIP document and elicit additional comments.

After the public review period ends, the MPO board reviews all municipal and public comments and may change elements of the document or its programming. The MPO board then endorses the TIP and submits it to the Federal Highway Administration (FHWA) and the Federal Transit Administration (FTA) for approval. MassDOT incorporates the MPO-endorsed TIP into the State Transportation Improvement Program (STIP). The FHWA, FTA, and United States Environmental Protection Agency review the STIP for certification by September 30, the close of the federal fiscal year.

Updates to the TIP

Even after the TIP has been finalized, administrative modifications, amendments, and adjustments often must be introduced because of changes in project schedule, project cost, funding sources, or available revenues. This may necessitate reprogramming a project in a different funding year or programming additional funds for a project.

Notices of administrative modifications and amendments are posted on the MPO’s website. If an amendment is necessary, the MPO notifies affected municipalities, stakeholders, and members of the public via email. The MPO typically holds a 21-day public review period before taking final action on an amendment. In extraordinary circumstances, the MPO may vote to shorten the public comment period to a minimum of 15 days. Administrative modifications and adjustments are minor and usually do not warrant a public review period.

Stay Involved with the TIP

Public input is an important aspect of the transportation planning process. Please visit bostonmpo.org for more information about the MPO, to view the entire TIP, and to submit your comments. You also may wish to sign up for email news updates and notices by visiting bostonmpo.org/subscribe and submitting your contact information. To request a copy of the TIP in accessible formats, please contact the MPO staff by any of the following means:

Mail: Boston Region MPO c/o CTPS Certification Activities Group, 10 Park Plaza, Suite 2150, Boston, MA 02116-3968

Telephone: 857.702.3702 (voice)

For people with hearing or speaking difficulties, connect through the state MassRelay service:

Relay Using TTY or Hearing Carry-over: 800.439.2370
Relay Using Voice Carry-over: 866.887.6619
Relay Using Text to Speech: 866.645.9870

Fax: 617.570.9192

Email: publicinfo@ctps.org

The Executive Summary of the FFYs 2022–26 TIP is also available as a translation:

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Chapter 1
3C Transportation Planning and the Boston Region MPO

Decisions about how to allocate transportation funds in a metropolitan area are guided by information and ideas gathered from a broad group of people, including elected officials, municipal planners and engineers, transportation advocates, and interested residents. Metropolitan planning organizations (MPOs) are the bodies responsible for providing a forum for this decision-making process. Each metropolitan area in the United States with a population of 50,000 or more, also known as an urbanized area, is required by federal legislation to establish an MPO, which decides how to spend federal transportation funds for capital projects and planning studies for the area. 

 

THE TRANSPORTATION PLANNING PROCESS

The federal government regulates the funding, planning, and operation of the surface transportation system through the federal transportation program, which was enacted into law through Titles 23 and 49 of the United States Code. Section 134 of Title 23 of the Federal Aid Highway Act, as amended, and Section 5303 of Title 49 of the Federal Transit Act, as amended, require that urbanized areas conduct a transportation planning process, resulting in plans and programs consistent with the planning objectives of the metropolitan area, in order to be eligible for federal funds.

 

The most recent reauthorization of the surface transportation law is the Fixing America’s Surface Transportation (FAST) Act. The FAST Act sets policies related to metropolitan transportation planning. The law requires that all MPOs carry out a continuing, comprehensive, and cooperative (3C) transportation planning process.

 

3C Transportation Planning

The Boston Region MPO is responsible for carrying out the 3C planning process in the Boston region. The MPO has established the following objectives for the process:

 

 

More information about the federal, state, and regional guidance governing the transportation planning process, and about the regulatory framework in which the MPO operates can be found in Appendix E.

 

THE BOSTON REGION MPO

The Boston Region MPO’s planning area extends across 97 cities and towns from Boston north to Ipswich, south to Marshfield, and west to Interstate 495.

 

Figure 1-1 shows the map of the Boston Region MPO’s member municipalities.

 

Figure 1-1: Municipalities in the Boston Region

Map of the Boston Region MPO's municipalities showing subregional boundaries and MPO membership representation

 

The MPO’s board comprises 22 voting members. Several state agencies, regional organizations, and the City of Boston are permanent voting members, while 12 municipalities are elected as voting members for three-year terms. Eight municipal members represent each of the eight subregions of the Boston region, and there are four at-large municipal seats. The Federal Highway Administration (FHWA) and Federal Transit Administration (FTA) participate on the MPO board as advisory (nonvoting) members. More details about the MPO’s permanent members can be found in Appendix F.

 

Figure 1-2 shows MPO membership and the organization of the Central Transportation Planning Staff, which serves as staff to the MPO.

 

Figure 1-2: Boston Region MPO Organizational Chart

 

Organizational flow chart showing the MPO membership and CTPS staff

 

MPO Central Vision Statement

The following paragraph is the MPO’s central vision statement, as adopted in Destination 2040, the MPO’s current Long-Range Transportation Plan (LRTP).

 

The Boston Region MPO envisions a modern, well-maintained transportation system that supports a sustainable, healthy, livable, and economically vibrant region. To achieve this vision, the transportation system must be safe and resilient; incorporate emerging technologies; and provide equitable access, excellent mobility, and varied transportation options.

 

This vision statement takes into consideration the significant public input received during the drafting of the Needs Assessment for Destination 2040. This statement also reflects the MPO’s desire to add emphasis to the maintenance and resilience of the transportation system while supporting the MPO’s six core goals: Safety, System Preservation and Modernization, Capacity Management and Mobility, Clean Air and Sustainable Communities, Transportation Equity, and Economic Vitality. More information on the MPO’s vision, goals, and objectives for the transportation system is available in Figure 1-3 below.

 

Certification Documents

As part of its 3C process, the Boston Region MPO annually produces the Transportation Improvement Program (TIP) and the Unified Planning Work Program (UPWP). These documents, along with the quadrennial LRTP, are referred to as certification documents and are required for the federal government to certify the MPO’s planning process. This federal certification is a prerequisite for the MPO to receive federal transportation funds. In addition to the requirement to produce the LRTP, TIP, and UPWP, the MPO must establish and conduct an inclusive public participation process, and maintain transportation models and data resources to support air quality conformity determinations and long- and short-range planning work and initiatives. 

 

The following is a summary of each of the certification documents.

 

The LRTP guides decision-making on investments that will be made in the Boston region’s transportation system over the next two decades. It defines an overarching vision of the future of transportation in the region, establishes goals and objectives that will lead to achieving that vision, and allocates projected revenue to transportation projects and programs consistent with established goals and objectives. The Boston Region MPO produces an LRTP every four years. Destination 2040, the current LRTP, was endorsed by the MPO board in August 2019 and went into effect on October 1, 2019. Figure 1-3 shows the MPO’s goals and objectives as adopted by the MPO board in Destination 2040.

 

The TIP is a multiyear, multimodal program of transportation improvements that is consistent with the LRTP. It describes and prioritizes transportation projects that are expected to be implemented during a five-year period. The types of transportation projects funded include major highway reconstruction and maintenance, arterial and intersection improvements, public transit expansion and maintenance, bicycle paths and facilities, improvements for pedestrians, and first- and last-mile connections to transit or other key destinations. The TIP contains a financial plan that shows the revenue sources, current or proposed, for each project. The TIP serves as the implementation arm of the MPO’s LRTP, and the Boston Region MPO updates the TIP annually. An MPO-endorsed TIP is incorporated into the State Transportation Improvement Program for submission to the FHWA, FTA, and United States Environmental Protection Agency for approval. 

 

The UPWP contains information about transportation planning studies that will be conducted by MPO staff during the course of a federal fiscal year, which runs from October 1 through September 30. The UPWP describes all of the supportive planning activities undertaken by the MPO staff, including data resources management, preparation of the federally required certification documents, and ongoing regional transportation planning assistance. The UPWP, produced annually, is often a means to study transportation projects and alternatives before advancing to further design, construction, and possible future programming through the TIP. The studies and work products programmed for funding through the UPWP are integrally related to other planning initiatives conducted by the Boston Region MPO, the Massachusetts Department of Transportation, the Massachusetts Bay Transportation Authority, the Massachusetts Port Authority, the Metropolitan Area Planning Council, and municipalities in the Boston region. 

 

Figure 1-4 depicts the relationship between the three certification documents and the MPO’s performance-based planning and programming process, which is a means to monitor progress towards the MPO’s goals and to evaluate the MPO’s approach to achieving those goals.

 

Figure 1-3
LRTP Goals and Objectives 

Central Vision Statement

The Boston Region Metropolitan Planning Organization envisions a modern, well-maintained transportation system that supports a sustainable, healthy, livable, and economically vibrant region. To achieve this vision, the transportation system must be safe and resilient; incorporate emerging technologies; and provide equitable access, excellent mobility, and varied transportation options.

Goals Objectives

SAFETY: Transportation by all modes will be safe

  • Reduce the number and severity of crashes and safety incidents for all modes
  • Reduce serious injuries and fatalities from transportation
  • Make investments and support initiatives that help protect transportation customers, employees, and the public from safety and security threats

SYSTEM PRESERVATION: Maintain and modernize the transportation system and plan for its resiliency

  • Maintain the transportation system, including roadway, transit, and active transportation infrastructure, in a state of good repair
  • Modernize transportation infrastructure across all modes
  • Prioritize projects that support planned response capability to existing or future extreme conditions (sea level rise, flooding, and other natural and security-related man-made impacts)

CAPACITY MANAGEMENT AND MOBILITY: Use existing facility capacity more efficiently and increase transportation options

  •  Improve access to and accessibility of all modes, especially transit and active transportation
  • Support implementation of roadway management and operations strategies to improve travel reliability, mitigate congestion, and support non-single-occupant vehicle travel options
  • Emphasize capacity management through low-cost investments; prioritize projects that focus on lower-cost operations and management-type improvements such as intersection improvements, transit priority, and Complete Streets solutions
  • Improve reliability of transit
  • Increase percentage of population and employment within one-quarter mile of transit stations and stops
  • Support community-based and private-initiative services and programs to meet first- and last-mile, reverse commute, and other nontraditional transit and transportation needs, including those of people 75 years old or older and people with disabilities
  • Support strategies to better manage automobile and bicycle parking capacity and usage at transit stations
  • Fund improvements to bicycle and pedestrian networks aimed at creating a connected network of bicycle and accessible sidewalk facilities (both regionally and in neighborhoods) by expanding existing facilities and closing gaps
  • Increase percentage of population and places of employment with access to facilities on the bicycle network
  • Eliminate bottlenecks on freight network and improve freight reliability
  • Enhance freight intermodal connections

TRANSPORTATION EQUITY: Ensure that all people receive comparable benefits from, and are not disproportionately burdened by, MPO investments, regardless of race, color, national origin, age, income, ability, or sex

  •  Prioritize MPO investments that benefit equity populations*
  • Minimize potential harmful environmental, health, and safety effects of MPO funded projects for all equity populations*
  •  Promote investments that support transportation for all ages (age-friendly communities)
  •  Promote investments that are accessible to all people regardless of ability

    *Equity populations include people who identify as minority, have limited English proficiency, are 75 years old or older or 17 years old or younger, or have a disability; or are members of low-income households.

CLEAN AIR/SUSTAINABLE COMMUNITIES: Create an environmentally friendly transportation system

  • Reduce greenhouse gases generated in Boston region by all transportation modes
  • Reduce other transportation-related pollutants
  •  Minimize negative environmental impacts of the transportation system
  • Support land use policies consistent with smart, healthy, and resilient growth

ECONOMIC VITALITY: Ensure our transportation network provides a strong foundation for economic vitality

  • Respond to mobility needs of the workforce population
  • Minimize burden of housing and transportation costs for residents in the region
  • Prioritize transportation investments that serve residential, commercial, and logistic- targeted development sites and “Priority Places” identified in MBTA’s Focus 40 plan
  • Prioritize transportation investments consistent with compact growth strategies of the regional land use plan

 

 

Figure 1-4: Relationship between the LRTP, TIP, UPWP, and Performance-Based Planning Process

 

figure showing the relationships between the LRTP,UPWP, TIP, and Performance-based Planning Process

 

 

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Chapter 2
The TIP Process

INTRODUCTION TO THE TIP PROCESS

One of the most important decisions a metropolitan planning organization (MPO) faces is deciding how to allocate limited funds for transportation projects and programs. Transportation improvements are part of the solution to many critical regional, state, national, and even global problems, such as traffic congestion, air pollution, fatalities and injuries on roadways, climate change, and environmental injustice. Because there is not nearly enough funding available for all of the necessary and worthy projects that would address these problems, an MPO’s investment choices must be guided by policies that help identify the most viable and effective solutions.

As described in Chapter 1, the Boston Region MPO develops a Long-Range Transportation Plan (LRTP) and a Transportation Improvement Program (TIP) to prioritize the expenditure of federal funds on transportation projects. The MPO staff manages the development of both plans. The annual development process for the TIP involves evaluating project funding requests from municipalities and state transportation agencies. The MPO staff then proposes a range of alternative scenarios for the programming of new and ongoing projects based on anticipated yearly funding levels, supports the MPO board by creating a draft TIP document, and facilitates a public involvement process that affords the public an opportunity to comment on proposed projects and review the draft TIP before the MPO board endorses the final document.

FUNDING the TIP

Federal Funding Framework

The first step in allocating federal transportation funds is the passage by the United States Congress of a multi-year act that establishes a maximum level of federal transportation funding per federal fiscal year (FFY).2-1 The establishment of this level of funding is referred to as an authorization.

After the authorization level has been established, the United States Department of Transportation annually allocates funding among the states according to various federal formulas. This allocation is referred to as an apportionment. The annual apportionment rarely represents the actual amount of federal funds that are ultimately committed to a state because of federally imposed limitations on spending in a given fiscal year, referred to as the obligation authority. In Massachusetts, TIPs are developed based on the estimated obligation authority.

Federal Highway Program

The FFYs 2022–26 TIP’s Highway Program was developed with the assumption that funding from the Federal-Aid Highway Program for the Commonwealth of Massachusetts would range between approximately $668 million and $721 million annually over the next five years. These amounts include the funds that would be set aside initially by the Massachusetts Department of Transportation (MassDOT) as payments for the Accelerated Bridge Program and exclude required matching funds.

The process of deciding how to use this federal funding in the Boston region follows several steps. MassDOT first reserves funding for Grant Anticipation Notes (GANs) debt service payments for the Accelerated Bridge Program; annual GANs payments range between approximately $86 million and $134 million annually over the five years of this TIP.

The remaining Federal-Aid Highway Program funds are budgeted to support state and regional (i.e., MPO) priorities. In the FFYs 2022–26 TIP, there is a total of approximately $726 million to $750 million assumed to be annually available statewide for programming (these amounts include both federal dollars and the state-provided local match). MassDOT customarily provides the local match (which can also be provided by other entities); thus, the capital costs of projects are typically funded with 80 percent federal dollars and 20 percent state dollars, depending on the funding program. Costs for project design are borne by the proponent of the project.

Regional Targets

The Regional Targets are discretionary funds for MPOs, sub-allocated by formula to each metropolitan planning region. The Boston Region MPO receives about 43 percent of the total funds available statewide for Regional Targets. MassDOT developed the target formula for determining this distribution of funds in consultation with the Massachusetts Association of Regional Planning Agencies (MARPA).

Each MPO in the state can decide how to prioritize its Regional Target funding. Given that the Regional Target funding originates from the Federal-Aid Highway Program, the Boston Region MPO board typically programs the majority of its target funding on roadway projects; however, the MPO board has flexed portions of its TIP Highway Program funding to the TIP’s Transit Program, most notably when the MPO board provided funding in support of the Green Line Extension transit expansion project. Additionally, the FFYs 2022–26 TIP includes an annual allotment of funding to the MPO’s Transit Modernization Program beginning in FFY 2025. This represents the MPO’s first formalized effort to flex Federal-Aid Highway funds to transit projects on a yearly basis, an affirmation of the region’s goals to support multimodal transportation options in a meaningful way. More information on the MPO’s investment strategy is discussed later in this chapter.

During the next five years, the Boston Region MPO’s total Regional Target funding will be approximately $539 million, an average of $107.8 million per year. To decide how to spend its Regional Target funding, the MPO engages its 97 cities and towns in an annual TIP development process.

Federal Highway Administration Programs

The Federal-Aid Highway Program dollars discussed in this chapter come through several Federal Highway Administration (FHWA) funding programs, each of which has unique requirements. Table 2-1 lists these programs, which come from the Fixing America’s Surface Transportation (FAST) Act and fund projects in the FFYs 2022–26 TIP.  

Table 2-1
Federal Highway Administration Programs Applicable to the FFYs 2022–26 Transportation Improvement Program

 

FAST Act Program

Eligible Uses

Congestion Mitigation and

Air Quality Improvement

(CMAQ)

A wide range of projects to reduce congestion and improve air quality in nonattainment and maintenance areas for ozone, carbon monoxide, and particulate matter

Highway Safety

Improvement Program

(HSIP)

Implementation of infrastructure-related highway safety improvements

National Highway

Performance Program

(NHPP)

Improvements to interstate routes, major urban and rural arterials, connectors to major intermodal facilities, and the national defense network; replacement or rehabilitation of any public bridge; and resurfacing, restoring, and rehabilitating routes on the Interstate Highway System

Surface Transportation

Block Grant Program

(STBGP) [formerly the

Surface Transportation

Program (STP)]

A broad range of surface transportation capital needs, including roads; transit, sea, and airport access; and vanpool, bicycle, and pedestrian facilities

Transportation Alternatives

Program (TAP)

A set-aside from the STBGP that funds the construction of infrastructure-related projects (for example, sidewalk, crossing, and on-road bicycle facility improvements)

Metropolitan Planning

Facilities that contribute to an intermodal transportation system, including intercity bus, pedestrian, and bicycle facilities

National Highway Freight

Program (NHFP)

Projects that improve the efficient movement of freight on the National Highway Freight Network

Source: Federal Highway Administration 

Federal Transit Program

Federal aid for public transit authorities is allocated by formula to urbanized areas (UZAs). MassDOT is the recipient of this federal aid in the Boston MA-NH-RI UZA. In UZAs with populations greater than 200,000, such as the Boston MA-NH-RI UZA, the distribution formula factors in passenger-miles traveled, population density, and other factors associated with each transit provider. The three regional transit authorities (RTAs) in the Boston Region MPO area are the Massachusetts Bay Transportation Authority (MBTA), MetroWest Regional Transit Authority (MWRTA), and Cape Ann Transportation Authority (CATA). The MBTA, with its extensive transit program and infrastructure, is the recipient of the preponderance of federal transit funds in the region.

The Federal Transit Administration (FTA) distributes funding to transit agencies through several different programs. Table 2-2 shows FTA programs that come from the FAST Act and support transit investments in the FFYs 2022–26 TIP.

 

Table 2-2
Federal Transit Administration Programs Applicable to the FFYs 2022–26 Transportation Improvement Program
 

FAST Act Program

Eligible Uses

Urbanized Area Formula

Grants (Section 5307)

Transit capital and operating assistance in urbanized areas

Fixed Guideway/Bus (Section 5337)

Replacement, rehabilitation, and other state-of-good-repair capital projects

Bus and Bus Facilities

(Section 5339)

Capital projects to replace, rehabilitate, and purchase buses and related equipment, and to construct bus-related facilities

Enhanced Mobility of

Seniors and Individuals with Disabilities (Section 5310)

Capital expenses that support transportation to meet the special needs of older adults and persons with disabilities

Fixed-Guideway Capital

Investment Grants (Section 5309)

Grants for new and expanded rail, bus rapid transit, and ferry systems that reflect local priorities to improve transportation options in key corridors

Source: Federal Transit Administration

INVESTMENT FRAMEWORKS

MPO Investment Framework

As mentioned previously, each MPO in the state can decide how to prioritize the Regional Target funding it receives through the processes established by FHWA and MassDOT. The Boston Region MPO’s LRTP defines the investment framework that informs the specific investment decisions made in the TIP by establishing

MPO Goals and Objectives

The MPO’s goals and objectives provide the foundation for the evaluation criteria the MPO board uses when selecting transportation projects to be funded with Regional Target dollars. MPO staff compares candidate projects’ characteristics to these criteria to evaluate whether individual projects can help the MPO advance its various goals. The criteria used to select projects for this TIP are based on the MPO’s goals and objectives, adopted as part of Destination 2040, which is the LRTP the MPO endorsed in August 2019. These goals and objectives are listed in Chapter 1.

MPO Investment Programs

In Destination 2040, the MPO strengthened the link between its spending and improvements to transportation performance by revising its investment programs to include a broader range of prospective projects. These investment programs focus on specific types of projects that the MPO expects will help achieve its goals and objectives for the transportation system. The MPO created these programs to give municipalities the confidence that if they design these types of projects the MPO will be willing to fund them through the TIP:

Figure 2-1 provides details about the Destination 2040 investment programs and their relationship to the MPO’s goals. When developing the FFYs 2022–26 TIP, the MPO allocated its Regional Target dollars to these investment programs by assigning them to projects that meet the investment programs’ criteria.

Figure 2-1
Destination 2040 Investment Programs

 

Newly created in Destination 2040, the Transit Modernization Program represents a significant shift in the MPO’s investment strategy, as funding will be allocated to transit projects on an annual basis beginning in FFY 2025. In prior years, the MPO only funded transit projects on a one-off basis when funding was requested for specific projects in the region. By creating the programming infrastructure to flex Regional Target highway funds to transit projects annually, the Boston Region MPO has established itself as a leader among MPOs nationally by crafting an investment strategy that is truly multimodal. The MPO has taken a clear stance that investing in transit is central to improving the region’s broader transportation system. The MPO’s five other investment programs were created during the development of prior LRTPs.2-2

While the MPO did not fund any specific Transit Modernization projects in this TIP cycle, funding was reserved in FFYs 2025 and 2026 for future allocation. In the meantime, the MPO will continue to work with municipalities and transit providers in the region to identify transit needs and determine the most effective use of this funding to address those needs.

Destination 2040 also reflects an updated set of priorities for the MPO's Complete Streets investment program, adding dedicated bus lanes and climate resiliency measures to the types of projects targeted for funding through this program. As with the Transit Modernization program, the MPO will continue to work with municipalities in future TIP cycles to develop and fund projects in these new areas of emphasis.

Finally, while the MPO’s Community Connections investment program was created through the 2015 LRTP, Charting Progress to 2040, the FFYs 2021–25 TIP represented the first TIP cycle that allocated this funding to specific projects. In prior TIP cycles, the $2 million in annual funding for this program was reserved for future use but not allocated, as the development timeline for the first- and last-mile projects funded through this program is much shorter than for other TIP projects. In the FFYs 2022–26 TIP, the MPO built on the success of last year’s pilot round of the Community Connections Program, funding nine additional projects on top of the five projects funded in the previous TIP cycle. Funding continues to be reserved in FFYs 2023–26 for allocation in future TIP cycles. More information on the projects selected for funding in each of the MPO’s investment programs can be found in Chapter 3.

Other Funding Guidelines

When creating investment program guidelines for Destination 2040, the MPO elected to decrease the amount of funding allocated to large-scale projects that would be included in its Major Infrastructure Program in order to focus a larger percentage of funding on lower cost, operations-and-management projects. Such a funding mix will help the MPO address its goals and provide more opportunities for the MPO to distribute federal transportation dollars to projects throughout the region, as opposed to concentrating it on a few large-scale projects.

Early in the development of the FFYs 2022–26 TIP, the MPO reassessed its definition of Major Infrastructure projects, adopting a new definition through sequential votes on August 20, 2020, and October 1, 2020. The MPO previously defined Major Infrastructure projects as those that cost more than $20 million or that add capacity to the transportation network. The MPO’s new definition classifies Major Infrastructure projects as those that meet any of the following criteria:

Under the MPO’s prior Major Infrastructure definition, the relatively low cost threshold caused several large-scale Complete Streets projects to be classified as Major Infrastructure projects although they were more local in nature. The changes outlined above are intended to focus the Major Infrastructure investment program on those projects that are of significant scale or that are truly important for the broader MPO region. This allows the MPO to better compare like projects when conducting project evaluations. Because the MPO considers the five-year distribution of TIP funds across its investment programs relative to the goals set forth in the LRTP (as shown in Figure 2-2), properly categorizing projects is a critical component of the MPO’s decision-making process. Funding allocation goals like these are some of the LRTP-based guidelines the MPO employs to ensure limited Regional Target funding is programmed in ways that best achieve the MPO’s goals for transportation in the region.

Figure 2-2
Destination 2040 Funding Goals by MPO Investment Program

 

 

MassDOT and Transit Agency Investment Frameworks

MassDOT, in coordination with the MBTA, updates its rolling five-year Capital Investment Plan (CIP) on an annual basis. This planning document identifies priority roadway, transit, bridge, and statewide infrastructure projects for the five MassDOT divisions and the MBTA. The CIP process uses a framework that prioritizes funding according to MassDOT’s strategic goals. Reliability is the top priority for MassDOT, followed by modernization and then expansion. MassDOT and the MBTA have created investment programs for the CIP that relate to these strategic goals, and allocate funding to these programs in ways that emphasize their priority. These goals and investment programs are as follows:

DEVELOPING THE TIP

Project Selection Process

Overview

The MPO applies its investment framework when developing the TIP. The MPO board’s process for selecting projects to receive highway discretionary—or Regional Target—funding relies on evaluation criteria to help identify and prioritize projects that advance the MPO’s goals. The criteria are based on the MPO’s goals and objectives outlined in the LRTP. All projects are required to show consistency with the LRTP and other statewide and regional plans. Other considerations include the readiness of a project for construction and municipal support for the project. Background information about the TIP project evaluation process is presented in Appendix A.

In the wake of the adoption of Destination 2040 in August 2019, the MPO began the process of revising the TIP evaluation criteria to enhance alignment with the MPO’s updated goals, objectives, and investment programs. These new criteria were adopted by the MPO on October 1, 2020, and were employed during the project selection process for the FFYs 2022–26 TIP. The final criteria were the result of a 15-month process that engaged nearly 1,100 members of the public through surveys and focus groups. This process also prioritized the inclusion of significant direct input from MPO members, which was gathered from more than a dozen presentations, discussions, and focus groups. The outcomes of this process are discussed further in the Project Evaluation section on the following pages.

Because of the limitations on in-person gatherings caused by the COVID-19 pandemic, a vast majority of the surveys, focus groups, and presentations discussed above were conducted virtually, with participation options both online and over the telephone. These virtual engagement opportunities allowed MPO staff to pursue new ways of building relationships with members of the public and other key stakeholders in the region. Given the increase in access to the TIP criteria revision process afforded by these virtual events, MPO staff intend to develop a hybrid outreach model that would support both in-person and virtual engagement when it is safe to resume in-person meetings.

In addition to the process outlined above, which focused on developing new criteria for five of the MPO’s investment programs (Bicycle Network and Pedestrian Connections, Complete Streets, Intersection Improvements, Major Infrastructure, and Transit Modernization), the MPO also adjusted the project selection criteria used to evaluate and fund projects through the Community Connections Program. These revisions were made based on the lessons learned by MPO staff through the pilot round of this program, which took place during the FFYs 2021–25 TIP cycle. More information on these criteria is available in the Project Evaluation section of this chapter, as well as in Appendix A.

Outreach and Data Collection (October–November)

The TIP development process begins early in the federal fiscal year when cities and towns in the region designate staff as TIP contacts and begin developing a list of priority projects to be considered for federal funding. Each fall, the MPO staff asks these TIP contacts to identify their city or town’s priority projects and then MPO staff elicits input from interested parties and members of the general public.

These discussions on municipalities’ priority projects mark the start of a robust dialogue between MPO staff and project proponents that continues through the duration of the TIP cycle. As noted above, the COVID-19 pandemic forced the transition of all of these conversations for the FFYs 2022–26 TIP cycle to take place virtually. During the fall of 2020, MPO staff held two virtual workshops for municipalities in the region to develop an understanding of the TIP process. MPO staff provided additional one-on-one virtual office hours throughout the fall for proponents to ask more detailed questions about advancing specific projects for funding, with more than two dozen office hour sessions booked for this purpose during the early stages of developing the FFYs 2022–26 TIP.

Once project proponents have decided to pursue federal funding, they must begin the formal project initiation process. All new Bicycle Network and Pedestrian Connections, Complete Streets, Intersection Improvements, and Major Infrastructure projects must be initiated with the MassDOT Highway Division before they can be considered for programming in the TIP. MassDOT details this process on its project initiation webpage, mass.gov/info-details/massdot-highway-initiating-a-project. To be considered for programming, proponents of Community Connections projects must submit an application for funding directly to MPO staff, as these projects do not need to be initiated by MassDOT.   

The MPO staff compiles project funding requests for projects into a Universe of Projects list, which consists of all identified projects being advanced for possible funding in the Bicycle Network and Pedestrian Connections, Complete Streets, Intersection Improvements, and Major Infrastructure investment programs. The Universe includes projects that are at advanced stages of project design, those that are undergoing preliminary engineering and design, and projects still in the conceptual planning stage. Those projects that are active municipal priorities and that are feasibly ready to be programmed in the current TIP cycle continue forward into the MPO’s project evaluation process. Projects that are not ready for programming remain in the Universe for consideration in future TIP cycles. A project Universe is not developed for Community Connections projects, as all eligible projects within this program will be considered for funding during the TIP cycle in which project proponents apply.

Project Evaluation (December-February)

The MPO staff uses its project evaluation criteria to logically and transparently evaluate and select projects for programming in the TIP that advance the MPO’s vision for transportation in the region. This process favors projects that support the following goals:

As was noted earlier in Chapter 2, the MPO undertook a process of revising the TIP evaluation criteria prior to the launch of the FFYs 2022–26 TIP to enhance the alignment between the TIP project selection process and the MPO’s updated goals, objectives, and investment programs outlined in Destination 2040. In terms of the overall structure of the criteria, this process resulted in the following outcomes:

In addition to these broader structural changes, a number of updates were made to individual criteria to better accomplish the MPO’s goals in the LRTP:

Several other changes were made to the project evaluation criteria, which are detailed in Appendix A. The point distributions by MPO investment program and LRTP goal area are also available in Figure 2-4. 

Though many of the adjustments listed above were in development prior to the onset of the COVID-19 pandemic, the emerging lessons from this event reinforced the importance of making such changes. These changes include emphasizing criteria that award points to projects that invest in walking, bicycling, and transit infrastructure. Also, the need for new criteria that more directly address existing disparities in health and transportation access for minorities and low-income households has been put into stark relief throughout the pandemic. While the MPO did not elect to rescore any currently programmed projects with these new criteria, the revised criteria will be employed in coming TIP cycles to support the funding of transportation projects that act on the lessons learned from COVID-19.

Prior to the FFYs 2022–26 TIP cycle, the MPO also undertook a parallel process to update its evaluation criteria for the smaller-scale, first- and last-mile projects considered for funding through the Community Connections Program. These adjustments were based on the lessons learned from the pilot round of this program during the FFYs 2021–25 TIP cycle. In these revisions, MPO staff aimed to create a more focused set of criteria that better aligned with the types of projects pursuing funding through this program. Revisions to the Community Connections criteria also addressed the discrepancies between capital and operating projects, as the pilot criteria more heavily favored operating projects. These adjustments resulted in more balanced scores that better reflected the goals of the program when implemented for the FFYs 2022–26 TIP cycle. More information on the scoring areas for these criteria is available in Figure 2-3, and all the criteria are available in Appendix A.

Figure 2-3
TIP Project Evaluation Criteria: Point Distribution for Community Connections Projects

Figure 2-4
TIP Project Evaluation Criteria: Point Distributions by Project Type (All Other Investment Programs)

 

In order for the MPO staff to conduct a complete project evaluation, each project proponent must provide enough information to meaningfully apply the criteria listed above. Bicycle Network and Pedestrian Connections, Complete Streets, Intersection Improvements, and Major Infrastructure projects must have a functional design report or be near the 25 percent design stage, or its plans must include the level of detail defined in a functional design report. (See MassDOT’s Project Development and Design Guide for information about the contents of a functional design report. This guide is available at mass.gov/lists/design-guides-and-manuals.) For Community Connections projects, proponents must submit a complete application to the MPO, including required supporting documentation.  

After MPO staff have completed an initial round of project scoring, draft scores are distributed to project proponents for their review. The MPO’s goal is to fairly and accurately assess all projects, making this review a critical component of the TIP process. Proponents are encouraged to submit feedback to MPO staff on their scores if they feel any criteria have been applied inaccurately. Proponents are also encouraged to submit additional supporting documentation on their projects if doing so would help clarify or correct any elements of the draft scoring. MPO staff take all proponent feedback into consideration and make any warranted adjustments to project scores before considering the evaluation process final and preparing the scores for presentation to the MPO.

For more details about the criteria used to score projects and project evaluation results for projects considered for programming in this TIP, see Appendix A.

TIP Readiness Day (February)

On TIP Readiness Day, the MPO staff meets with members of the MassDOT Highway Division to review cost and schedule changes related to currently programmed projects, which are undergoing design review, permitting, and right-of-way acquisition. The MPO board then considers these updated project construction costs and changes to the expected dates for construction advertisement when making decisions about changes to TIP programming. These changes have an impact on the ability of the MPO to program its target funds for new projects in the five-year TIP. 

Between the development of the FFYs 2021–25 TIP and the FFYs 2022–26 TIP, more than half of the projects programmed by the MPO experienced cost increases, many of which represented significant increases in percentage terms or in absolute cost. These changes placed severe limitations on the MPO’s ability to consider new projects for funding during the FFYs 2022–26 TIP cycle. As a partner to MassDOT’s Highway Division and Office of Transportation Planning, the MPO recognizes its role in supporting the on-time and on-budget delivery of projects by proponents. For this reason, the MPO board created a subcommittee to further explore the causes of project cost increases and devise MPO policy changes to support more reliable project delivery by all parties. The MPO expects this subcommittee to conclude its work in advance of the project selection process for the FFYs 2023–27 TIP. More information on this subject is available in Chapter 3. 

Staff Recommendation and Project Selection (March-April)

Using the evaluation scores and information gathered about project readiness (when a project likely would be fully designed and ready for advertisement) and cost, staff prepares possible TIP project programming scenarios for the MPO’s consideration. When developing these scenarios, MPO staff also considers whether a project was programmed in the LRTP, LRTP-based guidelines for allocating funds to different programs or project types, the distribution of investments across the region, and availability of sufficient funding. The MPO staff gather feedback from board members, project proponents, and the public to inform a final staff recommendation, which is then presented to the MPO for approval before it is included in the draft TIP for public review.

Given the project cost escalation issues outlined above, the MPO elected not to fund any new projects in the FFYs 2022–26 TIP except for those funded with approximately $2.5 million of Community Connections Program funds that had been previously reserved for such projects. This decision resulted in approximately $20.5 million remaining unprogrammed, allowing the MPO to reassess the use of these funds after any policy changes are made by the board prior to the FFYs 2023–27 TIP cycle. More information on the projects funded in the FFYs 2022–26 TIP, including the Community Connections projects funded with Regional Target funds, is available in Chapter 3.

Selection Process for Projects Prioritized by the State and Transit Agencies

As discussed above, the selection of transit, bridge, and statewide infrastructure projects for programming in the TIP draws primarily from MassDOT’s CIP. MassDOT and the MBTA evaluate projects for inclusion in CIP programs using criteria established by the independent Project Selection Advisory Council (PSAC). The following criteria from the PSAC process guide project evaluation:

Projects that receive the highest priority are those that meet MassDOT’s goals for maintaining and improving the overall condition and reliability of the system; modernizing the system to make it safer and more accessible and to accommodate growth; and expanding and diversifying transportation options for communities. These project-prioritization processes may also reflect other planning initiatives, such as Focus40, the MBTA’s 25-year investment plan, or MassDOT’s modal plans. More information on regulatory and planning guidance governing TIP project prioritization is available in Appendix E. Once project prioritization is complete, programming decisions are made based on these evaluations and information regarding project readiness, program sizing, and existing asset management plans.

As discussed above, the transit element of the TIP also includes the Federal-Aid Programs of the other two RTAs in the region, CATA and MWRTA. Once selection processes are complete, these agencies submit their lists of bridge projects, statewide infrastructure items, and transit capital projects to the MPO for review.

APPROVING THE TIP

Approval of the Draft TIP for Public Review

The MPO board considers the project evaluation results and staff recommendation when prioritizing projects for Regional Target funding. The board also considers public comments, the regional importance of projects, and other factors. In addition to prioritizing the Regional Target funding, the MPO board reviews MassDOT’s proposed statewide highway programming and the proposed capital programs for the MBTA, CATA, and MWRTA before voting to release a draft TIP for public review.

The MPO board votes to release the draft document for public review and invites members of the public, municipal and elected officials, and other stakeholders in the Boston region to review the proposed TIP. The MPO staff hosts outreach events during the public review period to elicit comments on the draft document. (See Appendix C for a full list of public comments submitted on the draft TIP.)

Approval of the Draft TIP

After the public review period ends, the MPO staff and board review all public comments, and the board may change the programming or the document as appropriate before endorsing the TIP. MassDOT staff incorporates the MPO-endorsed TIP into the State Transportation Improvement Program (STIP) and submits it to the FHWA and FTA for approval. The FHWA, FTA, and US Environmental Protection Agency review the STIP and certify it by September 30, the end of the federal fiscal year.

uPDATING THE TIP

The TIP is a dynamic program that may be amended and adjusted throughout the year. Administrative modifications and amendments are often introduced because of changes in project status (advertisement readiness), project cost, project design scope, or available revenue. An amendment is a revision that requires public review and a demonstration of fiscal constraint.

Consistent with federal guidelines, the Boston Region MPO must release an amendment if there is: (1) a change in project cost of $500,000 or more for projects valued at $5 million or less, or (2) a change of 10 percent or more of the project cost for projects valued greater than $5 million. TIP amendments are also released if there is a proposal to add or remove a project from the TIP or if the programming year of a project is changed. Cost changes that are less than the above threshold amounts may be considered in the form of administrative modifications or adjustments, which must still undergo MPO board action for approval. Administrative modifications or adjustments are also undertaken in the event that a project’s funding source changes. Although a public review period is not required for administrative modifications or adjustments, one may be offered at the MPO board’s discretion.

Though amendments to the TIP happen every year, anomalous events occur during certain TIP cycles that require action by the MPO board. During the development of the FFYs 2022–26 TIP, the reduction in ridership across the MBTA system caused by the COVID-19 pandemic—and the resulting decrease in farebox revenue—required an amendment to the FFYs 2021–25 TIP to reallocate a significant amount of MBTA capital funds to cover operating expenses. This decision delayed several federally funded capital projects, but allowed the MBTA the financial flexibility to fund preventative maintenance activities in support of the transit system’s continued operation during the crisis. Such an event reinforces the notion that the TIP is a living capital plan that is regularly amended in response to the changing needs of the region.

Regardless of the nature of an amendment, all proposed TIP amendments are presented in a public setting at an MPO meeting, and details are posted on the MPO’s website, bostonmpo.org. Public notices are distributed through the MPO’s email contact list, which members of the public may join by signing up on the MPO’s website. Municipal staff who are TIP contacts at the affected municipalities and the public are notified of pending amendments at the start of an amendment’s public review period.

Public Notice

Notices of draft TIP amendments include a summary of the amendment’s contents, dates of the public review period, contact information for submitting a comment to the MPO, and the date, time, and location that the MPO will vote on that amendment. Municipal representatives and members of the public are invited to submit written or oral testimony at the MPO meetings at which amendments are discussed or voted upon.

The MPO typically holds a 21-day public review period before taking final action on an amendment. In extraordinary circumstances, the MPO may vote to shorten the public review period to a minimum of 15 days. (These circumstances are detailed in the MPO’s Public Participation Plan.)

The MPO’s website is the best place to find current information about the TIP. All changes to the draft TIP and changes to the endorsed TIP, such as amendments and modifications that have been approved by the MPO, are available on the TIP webpage, bostonmpo.org/tip.

Comments or questions about the draft TIP materials may be submitted directly to the MPO staff via the website, email, or US mail, or voiced at MPO meetings and other public MPO events.

2-1 The most recent authorization act, Fixing America’s Surface Transportation (FAST) Act, was signed into law on December 4, 2015. A one-year extension of the FAST Act was signed into law on October 1, 2020.

2-2 The Community Connections Program was formerly referred to as the Community Transportation/Parking/Clean Air and Mobility Program when it was originally created in the MPO’s 2015 LRTP, Charting Progress to 2040.

 

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Chapter 3
Summary of Highway and Transit Programming

The Transportation Improvement Program (TIP) tables included in this chapter present a listing of all the projects and programs funded with federal highway and transit aid in the Boston region during federal fiscal years (FFYs) 2022–26. These funding tables are also included as part of the State Transportation Improvement Program (STIP).

 

Table 3-1 presents a summary of the Boston Region Metropolitan Planning Organization’s (MPO) share of Regional Target funds from the Federal-Aid Highway Program. The allocation of these funds is constrained by projections of available federal aid. As shown in Table 3-1, the MPO has programmed much of the available discretionary funds within the limits of projected funding for highway funding programs. As such, the FFYs 2022–26 TIP Regional Target Program complies with financial constraint requirements.

 

Table 3-1
Boston Region MPO Regional Target Program
Funding Summary

FFY 2022

FFY 2023

FFY 2024

FFY 2025

FFY 2026

Total

Regional Target Obligation Authority

$106,681,829

$109,011,849

$110,440,638

$107,862,383

$105,061,400

$539,058,099

Regional Target Funds Programmed

$106,638,666

$108,908,330

$110,440,638

$106,862,383

$84,712,047

$518,562,064

Regional Target Funds Unprogrammed

$43,163

$103,519

$0

$0

$20,349,353

$20,496,035

Source: Boston Region MPO.

 

In the FFYs 2022–26 TIP, the MPO elected to leave approximately $20.5 million in Regional Target funds unallocated to specific projects. This is uncharacteristic, as the MPO typically strives to fully allocate all of its funds in every fiscal year to the extent possible. In drafting this TIP, a significant number of projects that were selected for funding by the MPO in prior TIP cycles saw sizeable cost increases. The MPO’s historic policy has been—and continues to be—to use any available new funding to cover such cost increases before considering new projects for funding.

 

To provide certainty for project proponents, the MPO elected to maintain this policy during this TIP cycle, resulting in no allocation of funding for new projects in FFYs 2022–26 other than the 10 projects funded through the MPO’s Community Connections Program, which are listed in Table 3-2 below. The funding of these 10 projects—nine of which are new, and one of which is receiving a second and third year of funding—represents a successful second round of this new funding program for first- and last-mile projects, supporting the MPO’s ability to work towards its goals for the region even in years with limited available funding for new projects. (More information on these projects is available on the following pages of this chapter.) To support the MPO’s ability to fund more projects in future years, the MPO has formed a subcommittee of board members to examine the issue of project cost increases further. This subcommittee intends to conduct this work during the summer of 2021, with the intent of providing policy change recommendations to the MPO for adoption prior to the beginning of the FFYs 2023–27 TIP cycle in the fall of 2021.

 

Table 3-2
New Regional Target Projects Funded in the FFYs
2022–26 TIP

Project Name

Municipality (Proponent)

FFYs of Funding

Regional Target Dollars Programmed

Royall Street Shuttle

Canton

2022-24

$534,820

Newton Microtransit Service

Newton

2023-24*

$427,000

BlueBikes Expansion

Arlington, Newton, and Watertown

2022

$340,000

Alewife Wayfinding Improvements

Cambridge (128 Business Council)

2022

$292,280

Systemwide Bike Racks

MBTA

2022

$275,740

BlueBikes Expansion

Malden and Medford

2022

$236,830

Main Street Transit Signal Priority

Everett and Malden (MBTA)

2022

$225,000

Bicycle Infrastructure

Wellesley

2022

$85,054

Transit App Education Program

Brookline

2022

$43,620

Acton Parking Management System

Acton

2022

$20,000

Total

N/A

N/A

$2,480,344

Note: All projects in this table are funded through the MPO’s Community Connections Program.

*The first FFY of funding for the Newton Microtransit Service project is in FFY 2021, in which $300,000 was allocated to the project.

Source: Boston Region MPO.

 

Additional details of the specific projects programmed with Regional Target funding are shown in Section 1A of each annual element of the TIP tables (Table 3-7). The other sections in Table 3-7 (Sections 1B, 2A, 2B, and 2C) list the following:

 

 

Tables 3-8, 3-9, 3-10, and 3-11 list the federally funded transit projects and programs in the Boston region that the Massachusetts Bay Transportation Authority (MBTA), MetroWest Regional Transit Authority (MWRTA), and Cape Ann Transportation Authority (CATA) plan to undertake.

 

The second part of the chapter includes detailed descriptions of projects funded through both the Regional Target and statewide portions of the Highway Program, including evaluation scores (for MPO-funded projects), project proponents, and funding details. The pages are organized alphabetically by the municipality in which each project is located.

 

Investment Summary

This section summarizes the investments made by the Boston Region MPO, Massachusetts Department of Transportation (MassDOT), MBTA, CATA, and MWRTA in the FFYs 2022–26 TIP. Table 3-3 shows the Boston Region MPO’s investments of Regional Target funding—including both the number of projects and the dollar amount—by investment program. These investments are aimed at making progress towards the MPO’s goals for the region, including enhancing safety for all users, preserving and modernizing the transportation system, promoting mobility and reducing congestion, supporting clean air and sustainability, ensuring all have equitable access to the transportation system, and fostering economic vitality in the region through investments in transportation.

 

 

Table 3-3
FFYs 2022–26 Boston Region MPO Regional Target Investment Summary

MPO Investment Program

Number of Projects

Regional Target Dollars Programmed

Bicycle Network and Pedestrian Connections

4

$33,704,014

Community Connections (allocated to projects)

10

$2,480,344

Community Connections (not yet allocated to projects)

N/A

$7,522,281

Complete Streets

19

$220,955,609

Intersection Improvements

8

$62,805,302

Major Infrastructure—Flex to Transit*

1

$27,116,883

Major Infrastructure—Roadway

3

$152,977,631

Transit Modernization (not yet allocated to projects)

N/A

$11,000,000

Unprogrammed

N/A

$20,496,035

Total

45

$539,058,099

Note: Funding amounts in this table include both federal and non-federal funds, including matching funds.

* The MPO will flex federal highway improvement dollars to support the Green Line Extension.

In FFY 2022, the MPO will contribute $11,046,213 to Project 606476—Summer Tunnel Improvements—and MassDOT will contribute other funds. This project is included in the total number of projects in this category.

Source: Boston Region MPO.

 

Table 3-4 shows MassDOT’s FFYs 2022–26 TIP investments—including both the number of projects or programs and the dollar amount—organized by MassDOT program. MassDOT’s investments are distributed across a variety of programs and will support bridge and pavement improvements, roadway improvements and reconstruction, new bicycle and pedestrian infrastructure, and safety improvements. More details on these investments are available on the project summary pages that comprise the second section of this chapter.

 

Table 3-4
 MassDOT Highway Program Investment Summary

MassDOT Program

Number of Projects

MassDOT Dollars Programmed

Bicycles and Pedestrians

5

$34,054,640

Bridge Program

19

$146,335,182

Earmarks or Discretionary Grants*†

2

$146,559,638

Intersection Improvements

5

$21,394,315

Interstate Pavement

3

$59,772,691

Non-Interstate Pavement

8

$57,479,177

Roadway Improvements

1

$411,782

Roadway Reconstruction

8

$171,183,263

Safety Improvements

7

$37,638,458

Total

55

$674,829,146

Note: Funding amounts in this table include both federal and non-federal funds, including matching funds.

* Funding has been earmarked for two projects, both of which are also receiving funding through MassDOT’s Roadway Reconstruction Program (606476—Summer Tunnel Improvements, and 607977—Interstates 90/495 Interchange Reconstruction). Each project is counted in the tally for the Earmark Projects and Roadway Reconstruction categories, but is only counted once in the total number of projects funded.

Project 606476—Sumner Tunnel Improvements—is also funded with $22,115,687 in Regional Target funds, which are not shown in this table.

One project is funded through this program while also receiving funding through MassDOT’s Safety Improvements Program (608562—Signal and Intersection Improvements on Interstate 93 at Mystic Avenue and McGrath Highway in Somerville). This project is counted the tally for the Intersection Improvements and Safety Improvements categories, but is only counted once in the total number of projects funded.

Sources: MassDOT and the Boston Region MPO.

 

Table 3-5 shows the MBTA’s programs and associated TIP funding amounts, with additional details on the MBTA’s programs and projects in Tables 3-8 and 3-9 on the following pages. Investments made through these programs allow the MBTA to continue to maintain and modernize its infrastructure in support of the agency’s role as the largest transit provider in the Commonwealth of Massachusetts. The MBTA caters to a wide range of needs, serving the Boston region with commuter rail, light rail, subway, fixed-route bus, and paratransit services. The MBTA prioritizes projects that keep the existing transit system in a state of good repair, including the purchase of new rolling stock, accessibility and resiliency improvements to stations, the rehabilitation of bridges and tunnels, and the replacement of tracks and signals to support system-wide reliability. Limited system expansion projects are also undertaken through the MBTA’s federal capital program, as is currently demonstrated by the ongoing funding provided in support of the Green Line Extension project. Further information on how the MBTA’s investments support system safety and condition is available in Chapter 4.

 

Table 3-5
 MBTA Transit Program Investment Summary

Federal Transit Administration Program

MBTA Program

 MBTA Dollars Programmed

Section 5307: Urbanized Area Formula Grants

Revenue Vehicle Program

$735,977,381

Section 5307: Urbanized Area Formula Grants

Signals/Systems Upgrade Program

$0

Section 5307: Urbanized Area Formula Grants

Stations and Facilities Program

$233,100,526

Section 5337: Fixed Guideway/Bus Funds

Bridge and Tunnel Program

$295,197,136

Section 5337: Fixed Guideway/Bus Funds

Revenue Vehicle Program

$75,824,136

Section 5337: Fixed Guideway/Bus Funds

Signals/Systems Upgrade Program

$427,731,765

Section 5337: Fixed Guideway/Bus Funds

Stations and Facilities Program

$178,373,206

Section 5339: Bus and Bus Facilities Funds

Bus Program

$40,149,866

Section 5309: Fixed Guideway Capital Investment Grants

Green Line Extension—New Starts (Full Funding Grant Agreement)

$92,242,000

Other Federal Funds

Positive Train Control*

$745,369,284

Other Federal Funds

RRIF/TIFIA Financing Program

$715,000,000

Total

N/A

$3,538,965,301

Note: FTA formula funds (Sections 5307, 5337 and 5339) are based on estimated apportionments. TIP programs and projects are based on a preliminary draft Capital Investment Plan (CIP) as of April 22, 2021. Adjustments will be made to federal projects and budgets as the CIP process is finalized. Funding amounts in this table include both federal and non-federal funds, including matching funds.

* Positive Train Control investments are funded with Railroad Rehabilitation and Improvement Financing (RRIF) funds.

RRIF/Transportation Infrastructure Finance and Innovation Act (TIFIA) financing program funding is an initial estimate and will be refined as projects are identified and loans are finalized with the Build America Bureau.

Sources: MBTA and the Boston Region MPO.

 

Table 3-6 summarizes CATA and MWRTA investments included in the FFYs 2022-26 TIP, with further information available on each agency’s investments in Tables 3-10 and 3-11. Though the MBTA provides commuter rail service to the Cape Ann communities of Rockport and Gloucester, CATA provides additional paratransit and fixed-route bus services to these communities, and to Danvers, Peabody, Ipswich, Essex, and Beverly. CATA’s federal capital program supports its role in providing critical transportation alternatives to residents and visitors of the area, including through the replacement of buses, the modernization of facilities, and the maintenance of assets. MWRTA similarly complements MBTA commuter rail service, operating fixed-route bus, on-demand microtransit, and commuter shuttle services to a number of communities in the MetroWest subregion. MWRTA’s federal capital program supports this mission by funding vehicle replacements, station and facility maintenance and improvements, and operating assistance for paratransit services, among other efforts. Other projects funded in MWRTA’s 2022-26 TIP include the electrification of the agency’s paratransit fleet and investments in technology to support travel training and customer service efforts.

 

Table 3-6
 CATA and MWRTA Transit Program Investment Summary

Regional Transit Authority

Federal Transit Administration Program

 RTA Dollars Programmed

CATA

Section 5307: Urbanized Area Formula Funding

$3,105,000

CATA

State Transportation Bond Capital Assistance

$2,145,000

CATA

Municipal and Local Assessments

$356,250

MWRTA

Section 5307: Urbanized Area Formula Funding

$16,905,684

MWRTA

Section 5339: Bus and Bus Facilities

$250,000

MWRTA

State Transportation Bond Capital Assistance

$1,489,000

MWRTA

Other Federal

$27,450,990

MWRTA

Other Non-Federal

$721,100

Total

N/A

$52,423,024

Note: Funding amounts in this table include both federal and non-federal funds, including matching funds.
Sources: CATA, MWRTA, and the Boston Region MPO.

 

Tables 3-7 through 3-11 build on the summary tables listed above by detailing investments made through both the Highway and Transit Programs by project, program, and funding year.

 

Table 3-7
FFYs 2022-26 TIP Highway Table

Year MassDOT Project ID MPO Municipality MassDOT Project Description District Funding Source Adjusted TFPC Total Programmed Funds Federal Funds Non-Federal Funds Other Information
Federal Fiscal Year 2022 $299,464,327 $243,340,692 $56,123,635  
Section 1A / Regionally Prioritized Projects $132,888,666 $106,410,933 $26,477,733  
Roadway Reconstruction $35,094,904 $28,075,923 $7,018,981  
2022 602077 Boston Region Lynn LYNN- RECONSTRUCTION ON ROUTE 129 (LYNNFIELD STREET), FROM GREAT WOODS ROAD TO WYOMA SQUARE 4 CMAQ $6,643,384 $1,000,000 $800,000 $200,000 Construction; CMAQ+STBG Total Cost = $6,349,357; MPO Evaluation Score = 38
2022 602077 Boston Region Lynn LYNN- RECONSTRUCTION ON ROUTE 129 (LYNNFIELD STREET), FROM GREAT WOODS ROAD TO WYOMA SQUARE 4 STBG $6,643,384 $5,349,357 $4,279,486 $1,069,871 Construction; CMAQ+STBG Total Cost = $6,349,357; MPO Evaluation Score = 38
2022 606476 Boston Region Boston BOSTON- ROADWAY, CEILING, ARCH & WALL RECONSTRUCTION AND OTHER CONTROL SYSTEMS IN SUMNER TUNNEL 6 STBG $136,722,750 $11,046,213 $8,836,970 $2,209,243 Construction; NHPP+HSIP+Other Federal Aid Total Cost = $126,544,931; Total MPO Contribution = $22,115,687; AC schedule over 3 years (2021-2023). MPO funding has 2-year AC schedule (2021-22).
2022 608078 Boston Region Chelsea CHELSEA- RECONSTRUCTION ON BROADWAY (ROUTE 107), FROM CITY HALL AVENUE TO THE REVERE C.L. 6 CMAQ $11,301,176 $1,000,000 $800,000 $200,000 Construction; CMAQ+STBG Total Cost = $11,301,176; MPO Evaluation Score = 61
2022 608078 Boston Region Chelsea CHELSEA- RECONSTRUCTION ON BROADWAY (ROUTE 107), FROM CITY HALL AVENUE TO THE REVERE C.L. 6 STBG $11,301,176 $10,301,176 $8,240,941 $2,060,235 Construction; CMAQ+STBG Total Cost = $11,301,176; MPO Evaluation Score = 61
2022 608887 Boston Region Bellingham BELLINGHAM- REHABILITATION AND RELATED WORK ON ROUTE 126, FROM DOUGLAS DRIVE TO ROUTE 140 3 CMAQ $6,398,158 $2,000,000 $1,600,000 $400,000 Construction; CMAQ+STBG+TAP Total Cost = $6,398,158; MPO Evaluation Score = 45; TAP Proponent = Bellingham
2022 608887 Boston Region Bellingham BELLINGHAM- REHABILITATION AND RELATED WORK ON ROUTE 126, FROM DOUGLAS DRIVE TO ROUTE 140 3 STBG $6,398,158 $3,517,330 $2,813,864 $703,466 Construction; CMAQ+STBG+TAP Total Cost = $6,398,158; MPO Evaluation Score = 45; TAP Proponent = Bellingham
2022 608887 Boston Region Bellingham BELLINGHAM- REHABILITATION AND RELATED WORK ON ROUTE 126, FROM DOUGLAS DRIVE TO ROUTE 140 3 TAP $6,398,158 $880,828 $704,662 $176,166 Construction; CMAQ+STBG+TAP Total Cost = $6,398,158; MPO Evaluation Score = 45; TAP Proponent = Bellingham
Bicycle and Pedestrian $23,886,844 $19,109,475 $4,777,369  
2022 607738 Boston Region Bedford BEDFORD- MINUTEMAN BIKEWAY EXTENSION, FROM LOOMIS STREET TO THE CONCORD T.L. 4 CMAQ $11,000,168 $9,500,168 $7,600,134 $1,900,034 Construction; CMAQ+TAP Total Cost = $11,000,168; MPO Evaluation Score = 47; TAP Proponent = Bedford
2022 607738 Boston Region Bedford BEDFORD- MINUTEMAN BIKEWAY EXTENSION, FROM LOOMIS STREET TO THE CONCORD T.L. 4 TAP $11,000,168 $1,500,000 $1,200,000 $300,000 Construction; CMAQ+TAP Total Cost = $11,000,168; MPO Evaluation Score = 47; TAP Proponent = Bedford
2022 608164 Boston Region Multiple SUDBURY- CONCORD- BIKE PATH CONSTRUCTION (BRUCE FREEMAN RAIL TRAIL) 3 CMAQ $12,886,676 $8,834,137 $7,067,310 $1,766,827 Construction; CMAQ+TAP Total Cost = $12,886,676; MPO Evaluation Score = 40; TAP Proponent = Sudbury
2022 608164 Boston Region Multiple SUDBURY- CONCORD- BIKE PATH CONSTRUCTION (BRUCE FREEMAN RAIL TRAIL) 3 STBG $12,886,676 $3,552,539 $2,842,031 $710,508 Construction; CMAQ+TAP Total Cost = $12,886,676; MPO Evaluation Score = 40; TAP Proponent = Sudbury
2022 608164 Boston Region Multiple SUDBURY- CONCORD- BIKE PATH CONSTRUCTION (BRUCE FREEMAN RAIL TRAIL) 3 TAP $12,886,676 $500,000 $400,000 $100,000 Construction; CMAQ+TAP Total Cost = $12,886,676; MPO Evaluation Score = 40; TAP Proponent = Sudbury
Earmark Discretionary $26,250,000 $21,000,000 $5,250,000  
2022 607977 Boston Region Multiple HOPKINTON- WESTBOROUGH- RECONSTRUCTION OF I-90/I-495 INTERCHANGE 3 Other FA $285,366,126 $26,250,000 $21,000,000 $5,250,000 Other FA - SW HIP: $6,784,226 (FY 2022); HIP  Boston: $5,176,619 (FY 2022); BUILD Grant: $26,250,000 (FY 2022); HIP BR: $40,000,000 (FY 2023); $111,166,667 WT Funding
Intersection Improvements $18,537,410 $14,929,928 $3,607,482  
2022 608229 Boston Region Acton ACTON- INTERSECTION & SIGNAL IMPROVEMENTS AT KELLEY'S CORNER, ROUTE 111 (MASSACHUSETTS AVENUE) AND ROUTE 27 (MAIN STREET) 3 CMAQ $15,311,125 $3,000,000 $2,400,000 $600,000 Construction; CMAQ+TAP+STBG Total Cost = $15,311,125; MPO Evaluation Score = 45; TAP Proponent = Acton
2022 608229 Boston Region Acton ACTON- INTERSECTION & SIGNAL IMPROVEMENTS AT KELLEY'S CORNER, ROUTE 111 (MASSACHUSETTS AVENUE) AND ROUTE 27 (MAIN STREET) 3 STBG $15,311,125 $12,111,125 $9,688,900 $2,422,225 Construction; CMAQ+TAP+STBG Total Cost = $15,311,125; MPO Evaluation Score = 45; TAP Proponent = Acton
2022 608229 Boston Region Acton ACTON- INTERSECTION & SIGNAL IMPROVEMENTS AT KELLEY'S CORNER, ROUTE 111 (MASSACHUSETTS AVENUE) AND ROUTE 27 (MAIN STREET) 3 TAP $15,311,125 $200,000 $160,000 $40,000 Construction; CMAQ+TAP+STBG Total Cost = $15,311,125; MPO Evaluation Score = 45; TAP Proponent = Acton
2022 608443 Boston Region Multiple LITTLETON- AYER- INTERSECTION IMPROVEMENTS ON ROUTE 2A AT WILLOW ROAD AND BRUCE STREET 3 HSIP $3,226,285 $1,000,000 $900,000 $100,000 Construction; HSIP+STBG Total Cost = $3,226,285; MPO Evaluation Score = 36
2022 608443 Boston Region Multiple LITTLETON- AYER- INTERSECTION IMPROVEMENTS ON ROUTE 2A AT WILLOW ROAD AND BRUCE STREET 3 STBG $3,226,285 $2,226,285 $1,781,028 $445,257 Construction; HSIP+STBG Total Cost = $3,226,285; MPO Evaluation Score = 36
Flex to FTA $27,909,903 $22,327,922 $5,581,981  
2022 S10780 Boston Region Medford, Somerville GREEN LINE EXTENSION PROJECT- EXTENSION TO COLLEGE AVENUE WITH THE UNION SQUARE SPUR 4 CMAQ $27,096,238 $27,116,883 $21,693,506 $5,423,377 Construction; STBG+CMAQ+Section 5309 (Transit) Total MPO Contribution = $190,079,465; Total funding in this TIP = $27,116,883; AC Yr 6 of 6; Funding flexed to FTA; Match provided by local contributions
2022 S12116 Boston Region Cambridge ALEWIFE WAYFINDING IMPROVEMENTS 6 CMAQ $292,280 $292,280 $233,824 $58,456 Construction; CMAQ Total Cost = $292,280; MPO Evaluation Score = 24; Project funded through MPO's Community Connections Program.
2022 S12117 Boston Region Multiple MBTA SYSTEMWIDE BIKE RACKS Regionwide CMAQ $275,740 $275,740 $220,592 $55,148 Construction; CMAQ Total Cost = $275,740; MPO Evaluation Score = 64; Project funded through MPO's Community Connections Program.
2022 S12119 Boston Region Everett, Malden MAIN STREET TRANSIT SIGNAL PRIORITY 4 CMAQ $225,000 $225,000 $180,000 $45,000 Construction; CMAQ Total Cost = $225,000; MPO Evaluation Score = 72; Project funded through MPO's Community Connections Program.
Transit Grant Program $1,209,605 $967,684 $241,921  
2022 S12114 Boston Region Canton ROYALL STREET SHUTTLE 6 CMAQ $534,820 $209,101 $167,281 $41,820 Operations; CMAQ Total Cost = $534,820; MPO Evaluation Score = 51; Project funded through MPO's Community Connections Program. 
2022 S12115 Boston Region Multiple BLUEBIKES EXPANSION IN ARLINGTON, NEWTON, AND WATERTOWN 4, 6 CMAQ $340,000 $340,000 $272,000 $68,000 Construction; CMAQ Total Cost = $340,000; MPO Evaluation Score = 52; Project funded through MPO's Community Connections Program. 
2022 S12118 Boston Region Multiple BLUEBIKES EXPANSION IN MALDEN AND MEDFORD 4 CMAQ $236,830 $236,830 $189,464 $47,366 Construction; CMAQ Total Cost = $236,830; MPO Evaluation Score = 73; Project funded through MPO's Community Connections Program.
2022 S12120 Boston Region Wellesley WELLESLEY BICYCLE INFRASTRUCTURE 6 CMAQ $85,054 $85,054 $68,043 $17,011 Construction; CMAQ Total Cost = $85,054; MPO Evaluation Score = 42.75; Project funded through MPO's Community Connections Program.
2022 S12121 Boston Region Brookline TRANSIT APP EDUCATION PROGRAM 6 CMAQ $43,620 $43,620 $34,896 $8,724 Operations; CMAQ Total Cost = $43,620; MPO Evaluation Score = 49; Project funded through MPO's Community Connections Program.
2022 S12122 Boston Region Acton PARKING MANAGEMENT SYSTEM 3 CMAQ $20,000 $20,000 $16,000 $4,000 Construction; CMAQ Total Cost = $20,000; MPO Evaluation Score = 29; Project funded through MPO's Community Connections Program.
2022 S12125 Boston Region Newton NEWTON MICROTRANSIT SERVICE 6 CMAQ $427,000 $275,000 $220,000 $55,000 Operations; CMAQ Total Cost = $727,000; MPO Evaluation Score = 53; Project funded over three fiscal years (2021-2023)through MPO's Community Connections Program.
Section 1B / Earmark or Discretionary Grant Funded Projects $42,784,269 $34,227,415 $8,556,854  
Earmark Discretionary $42,784,269 $34,227,415 $8,556,854  
2022 606476 Boston Region Boston BOSTON- ROADWAY, CEILING, ARCH & WALL RECONSTRUCTION AND OTHER CONTROL SYSTEMS IN SUMNER TUNNEL 6 NHPP-E $136,722,750 $30,823,424 $24,658,739 $6,164,685 Construction; NHPP+HSIP+Other Federal Aid Total Cost = $126,544,931; Total MPO Contribution = $22,115,687; AC schedule over 3 years (2021-2023). MPO funding has 2-year AC schedule (2021-22).
2022 607977 Boston Region Multiple HOPKINTON- WESTBOROUGH- RECONSTRUCTION OF I-90/I-495 INTERCHANGE 3 HIP $285,366,126 $11,960,845 $9,568,676 $2,392,169 Other FA - SW HIP: $6,784,226 (FY 2022); HIP  Boston: $5,176,619 (FY 2022); BUILD Grant: $26,250,000 (FY 2022); HIP BR: $40,000,000 (FY 2023); $111,166,667 WT Funding
Section 2A / State Prioritized Reliability Projects $71,549,639 $57,283,481 $14,266,158  
Bridge On-system NHS $49,443,262 $39,554,610 $9,888,652  
2022 604173 Boston Region Boston BOSTON- BRIDGE REPLACEMENT, B-16-016, NORTH WASHINGTON STREET OVER THE BOSTON INNER HARBOR 6 NHPP $176,318,433 $28,825,727 $23,060,582 $5,765,145 Project ACd over 2017-2022.  
2022 604952 Boston Region Multiple LYNN- SAUGUS- BRIDGE REPLACEMENT, L-18-016=S-05-008, ROUTE 107 OVER THE SAUGUS RIVER (AKA - BELDEN G. BLY BRIDGE) 4 NHPP $98,962,749 $20,617,535 $16,494,028 $4,123,507 Project ACd over 2019-2022.  
Non-Interstate Pavement $3,248,450 $2,598,760 $649,690  
2022 608495 Boston Region Multiple CONCORD- LEXINGTON- LINCOLN- RESURFACING AND RELATED WORK ON ROUTE 2A 4 NHPP $3,248,450 $3,248,450 $2,598,760 $649,690  
Roadway Improvements $411,782 $329,426 $82,356  
2022 608599 Boston Region Multiple CANTON- NORWOOD- STORMWATER IMPROVEMENTS ALONG ROUTE 1 & I-95 5 STBG $411,782 $411,782 $329,426 $82,356  
Bridge Systematic Maintenance $5,349,900 $4,279,920 $1,069,980  
2022 608866 Boston Region Multiple NEWTON- WESTON- STEEL SUPERSTRUCTURE CLEANING (FULL REMOVAL) AND PAINTING OF 3 BRIDGES: N-12-051, W-29-011 & W-29-028 6 NHPP $2,349,900 $2,349,900 $1,879,920 $469,980  
2022 612028 Boston Region Stoneham STONEHAM- DECK REPLACEMENT & SUPERSTRUCTURE REPAIRS, S-27-006 (2L2), (ST 28) FELLSWAY WEST OVER I-93 4 NHPP $3,000,000 $3,000,000 $2,400,000 $600,000  
Safety Improvements $13,096,245 $10,520,766 $2,575,479  
2022 609060 Boston Region Multiple LYNNFIELD- PEABODY- DANVERS-  GUIDE AND TRAFFIC SIGN REPLACEMENT ON I-95/128 (TASK 'A' INTERCHANGE) 4 HSIP $437,700 $437,700 $393,930 $43,770  
2022 609090 Boston Region Multiple BOSTON- MILTON- QUINCY- HIGHWAY LIGHTING SYSTEM REPLACEMENT ON I-93, FROM NEPONSET AVENUE TO THE BRAINTREE SPLIT 6 NHPP $12,658,545 $12,658,545 $10,126,836 $2,531,709  
Section 2B / State Prioritized Modernization Projects $40,254,605 $35,829,145 $4,425,461  
Roadway Reconstruction $40,254,605 $35,829,145 $4,425,461  
2022 606476 Boston Region Boston BOSTON- ROADWAY, CEILING, ARCH & WALL RECONSTRUCTION AND OTHER CONTROL SYSTEMS IN SUMNER TUNNEL 6 NHPP $136,722,750 $4,000,000 $3,200,000 $800,000 Construction; NHPP+HSIP+Other Federal Aid Total Cost = $126,544,931; Total MPO Contribution = $22,115,687; AC schedule over 3 years (2021-2023). MPO funding has 2-year AC schedule (2021-22).
2022 607977 Boston Region Multiple HOPKINTON- WESTBOROUGH- RECONSTRUCTION OF I-90/I-495 INTERCHANGE 3 NHPP-I $285,366,126 $12,233,939 $11,010,545 $1,223,394 Other FA - SW HIP: $6,784,226 (FY 2022); HIP  Boston: $5,176,619 (FY 2022); BUILD Grant: $26,250,000 (FY 2022); HIP BR: $40,000,000 (FY 2023); $111,166,667 WT Funding
2022 607977 Boston Region Multiple HOPKINTON- WESTBOROUGH- RECONSTRUCTION OF I-90/I-495 INTERCHANGE 3 NFP-I $285,366,126 $24,020,666 $21,618,599 $2,402,067 Other FA - SW HIP: $6,784,226 (FY 2022); HIP  Boston: $5,176,619 (FY 2022); BUILD Grant: $26,250,000 (FY 2022); HIP BR: $40,000,000 (FY 2023); $111,166,667 WT Funding
Section 2C / State Prioritized Expansion Projects $11,987,148 $9,589,718 $2,397,430  
Bicycle and Pedestrian $11,987,148 $9,589,718 $2,397,430  
2022 608943 Boston Region Boston BOSTON- NEPONSET RIVER GREENWAY CONSTRUCTION, INCLUDING NEW BRIDGE B-16-309 (C6Y) OVER DORCHESTER BAY 6 CMAQ $8,809,272 $8,809,272 $7,047,418 $1,761,854  
2022 609066 Boston Region Multiple NEWTON- WESTON- MULTI-USE TRAIL CONNECTION, FROM RECREATION ROAD TO UPPER CHARLES RIVER GREENWAY INCLUDING RECONSTRUCTION OF PED BRIDGE N-12-078=W-29-062 6 CMAQ $3,177,876 $3,177,876 $2,542,301 $635,575  

 

Year MassDOT Project ID MPO Municipality MassDOT Project Description District Funding Source Adjusted TFPC Total Programmed Funds Federal Funds Non-Federal Funds Other Information
Federal Fiscal Year 2023 $275,789,516 $226,115,864 $49,673,653  
Section 1A / Regionally Prioritized Projects $108,908,329 $87,606,835 $21,301,494  
Intersection Improvements $15,627,974 $12,632,551 $2,995,423  
2023 606130 Boston Region Norwood NORWOOD- INTERSECTION IMPROVEMENTS AT ROUTE 1A & UPLAND ROAD/WASHINGTON STREET & PROSPECT STREET/FULTON STREET 5 CMAQ $8,270,371 $1,000,000 $800,000 $200,000 Construction; CMAQ+STBG Total Cost = $8,270,371; MPO Evaluation Score = 53
2023 606130 Boston Region Norwood NORWOOD- INTERSECTION IMPROVEMENTS AT ROUTE 1A & UPLAND ROAD/WASHINGTON STREET & PROSPECT STREET/FULTON STREET 5 STBG $8,270,371 $7,270,371 $5,816,297 $1,454,074 Construction; CMAQ+STBG Total Cost = $8,270,371; MPO Evaluation Score = 53
2023 608889 Boston Region Framingham FRAMINGHAM- TRAFFIC SIGNAL INSTALLATION AT EDGELL ROAD AT CENTRAL STREET 3 CMAQ $2,655,882 $1,680,000 $1,344,000 $336,000 Construction; CMAQ+STBG Total Cost = $2,655,882; MPO Evaluation Score = 41
2023 608889 Boston Region Framingham FRAMINGHAM- TRAFFIC SIGNAL INSTALLATION AT EDGELL ROAD AT CENTRAL STREET 3 STBG $2,655,882 $975,882 $780,706 $195,176 Construction; CMAQ+STBG Total Cost = $2,655,882; MPO Evaluation Score = 41
2023 609253 Boston Region Wilmington WILMINGTON- INTERSECTION IMPROVEMENTS AT LOWELL STREET (ROUTE 129) AND WOBURN STREET 4 CMAQ $4,701,721 $3,400,000 $2,720,000 $680,000 Construction; CMAQ+HSIP Total Cost = $4,701,721; MPO Evaluation Score = 53
2023 609253 Boston Region Wilmington WILMINGTON- INTERSECTION IMPROVEMENTS AT LOWELL STREET (ROUTE 129) AND WOBURN STREET 4 HSIP $4,701,721 $1,301,721 $1,171,549 $130,172 Construction; CMAQ+HSIP Total Cost = $4,701,721; MPO Evaluation Score = 53
Roadway Reconstruction $91,280,355 $73,374,284 $17,906,071  
2023 606226 Boston Region Boston BOSTON- RECONSTRUCTION OF RUTHERFORD AVENUE, FROM CITY SQUARE TO SULLIVAN SQUARE 6 NHPP $183,633,774 $13,000,000 $10,400,000 $2,600,000 Construction; NHPP+STBG+TAP Total Cost = $183,633,774; AC schedule over 5 years (2023-2027); Total funding in this TIP = $125,744,000; $25,000,000 in anticipated funding provided by City of Boston; MPO Evaluation Score = 59; TAP Proponent = Boston
2023 606226 Boston Region Boston BOSTON- RECONSTRUCTION OF RUTHERFORD AVENUE, FROM CITY SQUARE TO SULLIVAN SQUARE 6 STBG $183,633,774 $15,741,203 $12,592,962 $3,148,241 Construction; NHPP+STBG+TAP Total Cost = $183,633,774; AC schedule over 5 years (2023-2027); Total funding in this TIP = $125,744,000; $25,000,000 in anticipated funding provided by City of Boston; MPO Evaluation Score = 59; TAP Proponent = Boston
2023 606226 Boston Region Boston BOSTON- RECONSTRUCTION OF RUTHERFORD AVENUE, FROM CITY SQUARE TO SULLIVAN SQUARE 6 TAP $183,633,774 $1,000,000 $800,000 $200,000 Construction; NHPP+STBG+TAP Total Cost = $183,633,774; AC schedule over 5 years (2023-2027); Total funding in this TIP = $125,744,000; $25,000,000 in anticipated funding provided by City of Boston; MPO Evaluation Score = 59; TAP Proponent = Boston
2023 606453 Boston Region Boston BOSTON- IMPROVEMENTS ON BOYLSTON STREET, FROM INTERSECTION OF BROOKLINE AVENUE & PARK DRIVE TO IPSWICH STREET 6 CMAQ $8,665,052 $1,000,000 $800,000 $200,000 Construction; CMAQ+TAP+STBG Total Cost = $8,665,052; MPO Evaluation Score = 58; TAP Proponent = Boston
2023 606453 Boston Region Boston BOSTON- IMPROVEMENTS ON BOYLSTON STREET, FROM INTERSECTION OF BROOKLINE AVENUE & PARK DRIVE TO IPSWICH STREET 6 STBG $8,665,052 $6,852,620 $5,482,096 $1,370,524 Construction; CMAQ+TAP+STBG Total Cost = $8,665,052; MPO Evaluation Score = 58; TAP Proponent = Boston
2023 606453 Boston Region Boston BOSTON- IMPROVEMENTS ON BOYLSTON STREET, FROM INTERSECTION OF BROOKLINE AVENUE & PARK DRIVE TO IPSWICH STREET 6 TAP $8,665,052 $812,432 $649,946 $162,486 Construction; CMAQ+TAP+STBG Total Cost = $8,665,052; MPO Evaluation Score = 58; TAP Proponent = Boston
2023 607244 Boston Region Winthrop WINTHROP- RECONSTRUCTION & RELATED WORK ALONG WINTHROP STREET & REVERE STREET CORRIDOR 6 CMAQ $5,931,953 $2,000,000 $1,600,000 $400,000 Construction; CMAQ+STBG+TAP Total Cost = $5,931,953; MPO Evaluation Score = 54; TAP Proponent = Winthrop
2023 607244 Boston Region Winthrop WINTHROP- RECONSTRUCTION & RELATED WORK ALONG WINTHROP STREET & REVERE STREET CORRIDOR 6 STBG $5,931,953 $3,371,953 $2,697,562 $674,391 Construction; CMAQ+STBG+TAP Total Cost = $5,931,953; MPO Evaluation Score = 54; TAP Proponent = Winthrop
2023 607244 Boston Region Winthrop WINTHROP- RECONSTRUCTION & RELATED WORK ALONG WINTHROP STREET & REVERE STREET CORRIDOR 6 TAP $5,931,953 $560,000 $448,000 $112,000 Construction; CMAQ+STBG+TAP Total Cost = $5,931,953; MPO Evaluation Score = 54; TAP Proponent = Winthrop
2023 607777 Boston Region Watertown WATERTOWN- REHABILITATION OF MOUNT AUBURN STREET (ROUTE 16) 6 CMAQ $28,340,090 $1,000,000 $800,000 $200,000 Construction; HSIP+CMAQ+STBG Total Cost = $28,340,090; 2-year AC schedule (2023-2024); MPO Evaluation Score = 75 
2023 607777 Boston Region Watertown WATERTOWN- REHABILITATION OF MOUNT AUBURN STREET (ROUTE 16) 6 HSIP $28,340,090 $2,000,000 $1,800,000 $200,000 Construction; HSIP+CMAQ+STBG Total Cost = $28,340,090; 2-year AC schedule (2023-2024); MPO Evaluation Score = 75 
2023 607777 Boston Region Watertown WATERTOWN- REHABILITATION OF MOUNT AUBURN STREET (ROUTE 16) 6 STBG $28,340,090 $9,169,621 $7,335,697 $1,833,924 Construction; HSIP+CMAQ+STBG Total Cost = $28,340,090; 2-year AC schedule (2023-2024); MPO Evaluation Score = 75 
2023 607899 Boston Region Dedham DEDHAM- PEDESTRIAN IMPROVEMENTS ALONG BUSSEY STREET, INCLUDING SUPERSTRUCTURE REPLACEMENT, D-05-010, BUSSEY STREET OVER MOTHER BROOK 6 STBG $5,157,564 $4,630,368 $3,704,294 $926,074 Construction; STBG+TAP Total Cost = $5,157,564; MPO Evaluation Score = 35; TAP Proponent = Dedham
2023 607899 Boston Region Dedham DEDHAM- PEDESTRIAN IMPROVEMENTS ALONG BUSSEY STREET, INCLUDING SUPERSTRUCTURE REPLACEMENT, D-05-010, BUSSEY STREET OVER MOTHER BROOK 6 TAP $5,157,564 $527,196 $421,757 $105,439 Construction; STBG+TAP Total Cost = $5,157,564; MPO Evaluation Score = 35; TAP Proponent = Dedham
2023 608348 Boston Region Beverly BEVERLY- RECONSTRUCTION OF BRIDGE STREET 4 CMAQ $7,942,866 $3,000,000 $2,400,000 $600,000 Construction; CMAQ+STBG Total Cost = $7,942,866; MPO Evaluation Score = 66
2023 608348 Boston Region Beverly BEVERLY- RECONSTRUCTION OF BRIDGE STREET 4 STBG $7,942,866 $4,942,866 $3,954,293 $988,573 Construction; CMAQ+STBG Total Cost = $7,942,866; MPO Evaluation Score = 66
2023 608707 Boston Region Quincy QUINCY- RECONSTRUCTION OF SEA STREET  6 STBG $5,843,442 $5,617,188 $4,493,750 $1,123,438 Construction; STBG+TAP Total Cost = $5,843,442; MPO Evaluation Score = 40; TAP Project Proponent = Quincy
2023 608707 Boston Region Quincy QUINCY- RECONSTRUCTION OF SEA STREET  6 TAP $5,843,442 $226,254 $181,003 $45,251 Construction; STBG+TAP Total Cost = $5,843,442; MPO Evaluation Score = 40; TAP Project Proponent = Quincy
2023 608933 Boston Region Peabody PEABODY- REHABILITATION OF CENTRAL STREET 4 CMAQ $15,828,654 $3,000,000 $2,400,000 $600,000 Construction; CMAQ+HSIP+STBG Total Cost = $15,828,654; MPO Evaluation Score = 61
2023 608933 Boston Region Peabody PEABODY- REHABILITATION OF CENTRAL STREET 4 HSIP $15,828,654 $1,500,000 $1,350,000 $150,000 Construction; CMAQ+HSIP+STBG Total Cost = $15,828,654; MPO Evaluation Score = 61
2023 608933 Boston Region Peabody PEABODY- REHABILITATION OF CENTRAL STREET 4 STBG $15,828,654 $11,328,654 $9,062,923 $2,265,731 Construction; CMAQ+HSIP+STBG Total Cost = $15,828,654; MPO Evaluation Score = 61
Transit Grant Program $2,000,000 $1,600,000 $400,000  
2023 S12114 Boston Region Canton ROYALL STREET SHUTTLE 6 CMAQ $534,820 $177,177 $141,742 $35,435 Operations; CMAQ Total Cost = $534,820; MPO Evaluation Score = 51; Project funded through MPO's Community Connections Program. 
2023 S12124 Boston Region Multiple COMMUNITY CONNECTIONS PROGRAM Regionwide CMAQ $7,522,281 $1,670,823 $1,336,658 $334,165 Planning, Design, or Construction; Set Aside for LRTP Community Connections Program
2023 S12125 Boston Region Newton NEWTON MICROTRANSIT SERVICE 6 CMAQ $427,000 $152,000 $121,600 $30,400 Operations; CMAQ Total Cost = $727,000; MPO Evaluation Score = 53; Project funded over three fiscal years (2021-2023)through MPO's Community Connections Program.
Section 1B / Earmark or Discretionary Grant Funded Projects $51,607,808 $41,286,246 $10,321,562  
Earmark Discretionary $51,607,808 $41,286,246 $10,321,562  
2023 606476 Boston Region Boston BOSTON- ROADWAY, CEILING, ARCH & WALL RECONSTRUCTION AND OTHER CONTROL SYSTEMS IN SUMNER TUNNEL 6 NHPP-E $136,722,750 $11,607,808 $9,286,246 $2,321,562 Construction; NHPP+HSIP+Other Federal Aid Total Cost = $126,544,931; Total MPO Contribution = $22,115,687; AC schedule over 3 years (2021-2023). MPO funding has 2-year AC schedule (2021-22).
2023 607977 Boston Region Multiple HOPKINTON- WESTBOROUGH- RECONSTRUCTION OF I-90/I-495 INTERCHANGE 3 HIP-BR $285,366,126 $40,000,000 $32,000,000 $8,000,000 Other FA - SW HIP: $6,784,226 (FY 2022); HIP  Boston: $5,176,619 (FY 2022); BUILD Grant: $26,250,000 (FY 2022); HIP BR: $40,000,000 (FY 2023); $111,166,667 WT Funding
Section 2A / State Prioritized Reliability Projects $82,297,337 $68,887,030 $13,410,307  
Bridge On-system NHS $19,277,046 $15,421,637 $3,855,409  
2023 606902 Boston Region Boston BOSTON- BRIDGE RECONSTRUCTION/REHAB, B-16-181, WEST ROXBURY PARKWAY OVER MBTA 6 NHPP $6,644,290 $6,644,290 $5,315,432 $1,328,858  
2023 607327 Boston Region Wilmington WILMINGTON- BRIDGE REPLACEMENT, W-38-002, ROUTE 38 (MAIN STREET) OVER THE B&M RAILROAD 4 NHPP $13,127,334 $12,632,756 $10,106,205 $2,526,551  
Interstate Pavement $24,419,044 $21,977,140 $2,441,904  
2023 608208 Boston Region Multiple QUINCY- MILTON- BOSTON- INTERSTATE MAINTENANCE & RELATED WORK ON I-93 6 NHPP-I $24,419,044 $24,419,044 $21,977,140 $2,441,904  
Bridge Off-system $3,592,584 $2,874,067 $718,517  
2023 608255 Boston Region Stow STOW- BRIDGE REPLACEMENT, S-29-011, BOX MILL ROAD OVER ELIZABETH BROOK 3 STBG-BR-Off $3,592,584 $3,592,584 $2,874,067 $718,517  
Non-Interstate Pavement $16,481,993 $13,185,594 $3,296,399  
2023 608480 Boston Region Foxborough FOXBOROUGH- RESURFACING AND RELATED WORK ON ROUTE 1 5 NHPP $7,169,843 $7,169,843 $5,735,874 $1,433,969  
2023 608498 Boston Region Multiple QUINCY- WEYMOUTH- BRAINTREE- RESURFACING AND RELATED WORK ON ROUTE 53 6 NHPP $8,178,768 $8,178,768 $6,543,014 $1,635,754  
2023 608818 Boston Region Danvers DANVERS- RESURFACING AND RELATED WORK ON ROUTE 114 4 NHPP $1,133,382 $1,133,382 $906,706 $226,676  
Safety Improvements $11,116,611 $9,500,545 $1,616,066  
2023 608562 Boston Region Somerville SOMERVILLE- SIGNAL AND INTERSECTION IMPROVEMENT ON I-93 AT MYSTIC AVENUE AND MCGRATH HIGHWAY (TOP 200 CRASH LOCATION) 4 HSIP $6,122,559 $6,072,559 $5,465,303 $607,256  
2023 609053 Boston Region Multiple CANTON- DEDHAM- NORWOOD- HIGHWAY LIGHTING IMPROVEMENTS AT I-93 & I-95/128 6 NHPP $5,044,052 $5,044,052 $4,035,242 $1,008,810  
Bridge Systematic Maintenance $2,228,571 $1,782,857 $445,714  
2023 608609 Boston Region Multiple NEWTON- WESTWOOD- STEEL SUPERSTRUCTURE CLEANING (FULL REMOVAL) AND PAINTING OF 2 BRIDGES: N-12-056 & W-31-006 6 NHPP $2,228,571 $2,228,571 $1,782,857 $445,714  
Bridge On-system Non-NHS $5,181,488 $4,145,190 $1,036,298  
2023 608929 Boston Region Wilmington WILMINGTON- BRIDGE REPLACEMENT, W-38-003, BUTTERS ROW OVER MBTA  4 STBG $5,181,488 $5,181,488 $4,145,190 $1,036,298  
Section 2B / State Prioritized Modernization Projects $26,298,184 $22,993,466 $3,304,719  
Roadway Reconstruction $19,181,213 $16,588,192 $2,593,021  
2023 606476 Boston Region Boston BOSTON- ROADWAY, CEILING, ARCH & WALL RECONSTRUCTION AND OTHER CONTROL SYSTEMS IN SUMNER TUNNEL 6 NHPP $136,722,750 $5,261,993 $4,209,594 $1,052,399 Construction; NHPP+HSIP+Other Federal Aid Total Cost = $126,544,931; Total MPO Contribution = $22,115,687; AC schedule over 3 years (2021-2023). MPO funding has 2-year AC schedule (2021-22).
2023 607977 Boston Region Multiple HOPKINTON- WESTBOROUGH- RECONSTRUCTION OF I-90/I-495 INTERCHANGE 3 NFP-I $285,366,126 $12,432,212 $11,188,991 $1,243,221 Other FA - SW HIP: $6,784,226 (FY 2022); HIP  Boston: $5,176,619 (FY 2022); BUILD Grant: $26,250,000 (FY 2022); HIP BR: $40,000,000 (FY 2023); $111,166,667 WT Funding
2023 609530 Boston Region Medway MEDWAY- HOLLISTON STREET AND  CASSIDY LANE IMPROVEMENTS (SRTS) 3 TAP $1,487,008 $1,487,008 $1,189,606 $297,402  
Intersection Improvements $7,116,971 $6,405,274 $711,697  
2023 607342 Boston Region Milton MILTON- INTERSECTION & SIGNAL IMPROVEMENTS AT ROUTE 28 (RANDOLPH AVENUE) & CHICKATAWBUT ROAD 6 HSIP $7,066,971 $7,066,971 $6,360,274 $706,697  
2023 608562 Boston Region Somerville SOMERVILLE- SIGNAL AND INTERSECTION IMPROVEMENT ON I-93 AT MYSTIC AVENUE AND MCGRATH HIGHWAY (TOP 200 CRASH LOCATION) 4 HSIP $6,122,559 $50,000 $45,000 $5,000  
Section 2C / State Prioritized Expansion Projects $6,677,858 $5,342,286 $1,335,572  
Bicycle and Pedestrian $6,677,858 $5,342,286 $1,335,572  
2023 610674 Boston Region Newton NEWTON- RECONSTRUCTION OF COMMONWEALTH AVENUE (ROUTE 30), FROM EAST OF AUBURN STREET TO ASH STREET 6 CMAQ $6,677,858 $6,677,858 $5,342,286 $1,335,572  
Year MassDOT Project ID MPO Municipality MassDOT Project Description District Funding Source Adjusted TFPC Total Programmed Funds Federal Funds Non-Federal Funds Other Information
Federal Fiscal Year 2024 $216,037,614 $178,696,769 $37,340,845  
Section 1A / Regionally Prioritized Projects $110,440,638 $89,152,510 $21,288,128  
Intersection Improvements $17,456,745 $14,215,396 $3,241,349  
2024 603739 Boston Region Wrentham WRENTHAM- CONSTRUCTION OF ROUTE I-495/ROUTE 1A RAMPS 5 HSIP $16,187,418 $2,500,000 $2,250,000 $250,000 Construction; HSIP+STBG+TAP Total Cost = $16,187,418; MPO Evaluation Score = 55; TAP Proponent = MassDOT
2024 603739 Boston Region Wrentham WRENTHAM- CONSTRUCTION OF ROUTE I-495/ROUTE 1A RAMPS 5 STBG $16,187,418 $13,187,418 $10,549,934 $2,637,484 Construction; HSIP+STBG+TAP Total Cost = $16,187,418; MPO Evaluation Score = 55; TAP Proponent = MassDOT
2024 603739 Boston Region Wrentham WRENTHAM- CONSTRUCTION OF ROUTE I-495/ROUTE 1A RAMPS 5 TAP $16,187,418 $500,000 $400,000 $100,000 Construction; HSIP+STBG+TAP Total Cost = $16,187,418; MPO Evaluation Score = 55; TAP Proponent = MassDOT
2024 608436 Boston Region   ASHLAND- REHABILITATION AND RAIL CROSSING IMPROVEMENTS ON CHERRY STREET 3 STBG $1,269,327 $1,269,327 $1,015,462 $253,865 Construction; STBG Total Cost = $1,269,327; MPO Evaluation Score = 38
Roadway Reconstruction $87,735,523 $70,738,418 $16,997,105  
2024 605743 Boston Region Ipswich IPSWICH- RESURFACING & RELATED WORK ON CENTRAL & SOUTH MAIN STREETS 4 STBG $5,702,076 $5,182,526 $4,146,021 $1,036,505 Construction; STBG+TAP Total Cost = $5,702,076; MPO Evaluation Score = 47; TAP Proponent = Ipswich
2024 605743 Boston Region Ipswich IPSWICH- RESURFACING & RELATED WORK ON CENTRAL & SOUTH MAIN STREETS 4 TAP $5,702,076 $519,550 $415,640 $103,910 Construction; STBG+TAP Total Cost = $5,702,076; MPO Evaluation Score = 47; TAP Proponent = Ipswich
2024 606226 Boston Region Boston BOSTON- RECONSTRUCTION OF RUTHERFORD AVENUE, FROM CITY SQUARE TO SULLIVAN SQUARE 6 NHPP $183,633,774 $8,500,000 $6,800,000 $1,700,000 Construction; NHPP+STBG+TAP Total Cost = $183,633,774; AC schedule over 5 years (2023-2027); Total funding in this TIP = $125,744,000; $25,000,000 in anticipated funding provided by City of Boston; MPO Evaluation Score = 59; TAP Proponent = Boston
2024 606226 Boston Region Boston BOSTON- RECONSTRUCTION OF RUTHERFORD AVENUE, FROM CITY SQUARE TO SULLIVAN SQUARE 6 STBG $183,633,774 $20,946,838 $16,757,470 $4,189,368 Construction; NHPP+STBG+TAP Total Cost = $183,633,774; AC schedule over 5 years (2023-2027); Total funding in this TIP = $125,744,000; $25,000,000 in anticipated funding provided by City of Boston; MPO Evaluation Score = 59; TAP Proponent = Boston
2024 606226 Boston Region Boston BOSTON- RECONSTRUCTION OF RUTHERFORD AVENUE, FROM CITY SQUARE TO SULLIVAN SQUARE 6 TAP $183,633,774 $1,000,000 $800,000 $200,000 Construction; NHPP+STBG+TAP Total Cost = $183,633,774; AC schedule over 5 years (2023-2027); Total funding in this TIP = $125,744,000; $25,000,000 in anticipated funding provided by City of Boston; MPO Evaluation Score = 59; TAP Proponent = Boston
2024 607777 Boston Region Watertown WATERTOWN- REHABILITATION OF MOUNT AUBURN STREET (ROUTE 16) 6 STBG $28,340,090 $16,170,469 $12,936,375 $3,234,094 Construction; HSIP+CMAQ+STBG Total Cost = $28,340,090; 2-year AC schedule (2023-2024); MPO Evaluation Score = 75 
2024 608007 Boston Region Multiple COHASSET- SCITUATE- CORRIDOR IMPROVEMENTS AND RELATED WORK ON JUSTICE CUSHING HIGHWAY (ROUTE 3A), FROM BEECHWOOD STREET TO HENRY TURNER BAILEY ROAD 5 HSIP $12,990,931 $1,500,000 $1,350,000 $150,000 Construction; HSIP+STBG+TAP Total Cost = $12,990,391; MPO Evaluation Score = 37; TAP Proponent = MassDOT
2024 608007 Boston Region Multiple COHASSET- SCITUATE- CORRIDOR IMPROVEMENTS AND RELATED WORK ON JUSTICE CUSHING HIGHWAY (ROUTE 3A), FROM BEECHWOOD STREET TO HENRY TURNER BAILEY ROAD 5 STBG $12,990,931 $11,350,699 $9,080,559 $2,270,140 Construction; HSIP+STBG+TAP Total Cost = $12,990,391; MPO Evaluation Score = 37; TAP Proponent = MassDOT
2024 608007 Boston Region Multiple COHASSET- SCITUATE- CORRIDOR IMPROVEMENTS AND RELATED WORK ON JUSTICE CUSHING HIGHWAY (ROUTE 3A), FROM BEECHWOOD STREET TO HENRY TURNER BAILEY ROAD 5 TAP $12,990,931 $140,232 $112,186 $28,046 Construction; HSIP+STBG+TAP Total Cost = $12,990,391; MPO Evaluation Score = 37; TAP Proponent = MassDOT
2024 609054 Boston Region Littleton LITTLETON- RECONSTRUCTION OF FOSTER STREET 3 CMAQ $4,146,209 $1,000,000 $800,000 $200,000 Construction; CMAQ+TAP+STBG Total Cost = $4,146,209; MPO Evaluation Score = 38; TAP Proponent = Littleton
2024 609054 Boston Region Littleton LITTLETON- RECONSTRUCTION OF FOSTER STREET 3 STBG $4,146,209 $2,646,209 $2,116,967 $529,242 Construction; CMAQ+TAP+STBG Total Cost = $4,146,209; MPO Evaluation Score = 38; TAP Proponent = Littleton
2024 609054 Boston Region Littleton LITTLETON- RECONSTRUCTION OF FOSTER STREET 3 TAP $4,146,209 $500,000 $400,000 $100,000 Construction; CMAQ+TAP+STBG Total Cost = $4,146,209; MPO Evaluation Score = 38; TAP Proponent = Littleton
2024 609252 Boston Region Lynn LYNN- REHABILITATION OF ESSEX STREET 4 CMAQ $18,279,000 $6,000,000 $4,800,000 $1,200,000 Construction; CMAQ+HSIP+STBG Total Cost = $18,279,000; MPO Evaluation Score = 66
2024 609252 Boston Region Lynn LYNN- REHABILITATION OF ESSEX STREET 4 HSIP $18,279,000 $4,000,000 $3,600,000 $400,000 Construction; CMAQ+HSIP+STBG Total Cost = $18,279,000; MPO Evaluation Score = 66
2024 609252 Boston Region Lynn LYNN- REHABILITATION OF ESSEX STREET 4 STBG $18,279,000 $8,279,000 $6,623,200 $1,655,800 Construction; CMAQ+HSIP+STBG Total Cost = $18,279,000; MPO Evaluation Score = 66
Bicycle and Pedestrian $3,248,370 $2,598,696 $649,674  
2024 609211 Boston Region Peabody PEABODY- INDEPENDENCE GREENWAY EXTENSION 4 CMAQ $3,248,370 $1,972,500 $1,578,000 $394,500 Construction; CMAQ+TAP Total Cost = $3,248,370; MPO Evaluation Score = 34; TAP Proponent = Peabody
2024 609211 Boston Region Peabody PEABODY- INDEPENDENCE GREENWAY EXTENSION 4 TAP $3,248,370 $1,275,870 $1,020,696 $255,174 Construction; CMAQ+TAP Total Cost = $3,248,370; MPO Evaluation Score = 34; TAP Proponent = Peabody
Transit Grant Program $2,000,000 $1,600,000 $400,000  
2024 S12114 Boston Region Canton ROYALL STREET SHUTTLE 6 CMAQ $534,820 $148,542 $118,834 $29,708 Operations; CMAQ Total Cost = $534,820; MPO Evaluation Score = 51; Project funded through MPO's Community Connections Program. 
2024 S12124 Boston Region Multiple COMMUNITY CONNECTIONS PROGRAM Regionwide CMAQ $7,522,281 $1,851,458 $1,481,166 $370,292 Planning, Design, or Construction; Set Aside for LRTP Community Connections Program
Section 1B / Earmark or Discretionary Grant Funded Projects $25,917,561 $20,734,049 $5,183,512  
Earmark Discretionary $25,917,561 $20,734,049 $5,183,512  
2024 607977 Boston Region Multiple HOPKINTON- WESTBOROUGH- RECONSTRUCTION OF I-90/I-495 INTERCHANGE 3 HIP-BR $285,366,126 $25,917,561 $20,734,049 $5,183,512 Other FA - SW HIP: $6,784,226 (FY 2022); HIP  Boston: $5,176,619 (FY 2022); BUILD Grant: $26,250,000 (FY 2022); HIP BR: $40,000,000 (FY 2023); $111,166,667 WT Funding
Section 2A / State Prioritized Reliability Projects $38,102,340 $31,602,880 $6,499,461  
Bridge On-system Non-NHS $8,605,030 $6,884,024 $1,721,006  
2024 608197 Boston Region Boston BOSTON- BRIDGE REHABILITATION, B-16-107, CANTERBURY STREET OVER AMTRAK RAILROAD 6 STBG $4,678,193 $4,678,193 $3,742,554 $935,639  
2024 608522 Boston Region Middleton MIDDLETON- BRIDGE REPLACEMENT, M-20-003, ROUTE 62 (MAPLE STREET) OVER IPSWICH RIVER 4 STBG $3,926,837 $3,926,837 $3,141,470 $785,367  
Non-Interstate Pavement $6,930,814 $5,544,651 $1,386,163  
2024 609399 Boston Region Randolph RANDOLPH- RESURFACING AND RELATED WORK ON ROUTE 28 6 NHPP $6,930,814 $6,930,814 $5,544,651 $1,386,163  
Bridge Off-system $5,874,329 $4,699,463 $1,174,866  
2024 609438 Boston Region Canton CANTON- BRIDGE REPLACEMENT, C-02-042, REVERE COURT OVER WEST BRANCH OF  THE NEPONSET RIVER 6 STBG-BR-Off $2,617,932 $2,617,932 $2,094,346 $523,586  
2024 609467 Boston Region Multiple HAMILTON- BRIDGE REPLACEMENT, H-03-002, WINTHROP STREET OVER IPSWICH RIVER 4 STBG-BR-Off $3,256,397 $3,256,397 $2,605,118 $651,279  
Bridge On-system NHS $5,482,092 $4,385,674 $1,096,418  
2024 610782 Boston Region Multiple DANVERS-MIDDLETON - BRIDGE REPLACEMENT, D-03-009=M-20-005, ANDOVER STREET (SR 114) OVER IPSWICH RIVER 4 NHPP $5,482,092 $5,482,092 $4,385,674 $1,096,418  
Interstate Pavement $11,210,075 $10,089,068 $1,121,008  
2024 612034 Boston Region Multiple BURLINGTON- WOBURN- INTERSTATE MAINTENANCE AND RELATED WORK ON I-95 4 NHPP-I $11,210,075 $11,210,075 $10,089,068 $1,121,008  
Section 2B / State Prioritized Modernization Projects $41,577,075 $37,207,330 $4,369,745  
Roadway Reconstruction $35,730,602 $31,945,505 $3,785,097  
2024 607977 Boston Region Multiple HOPKINTON- WESTBOROUGH- RECONSTRUCTION OF I-90/I-495 INTERCHANGE 3 NFP-I $285,366,126 $33,610,230 $30,249,207 $3,361,023 Other FA - SW HIP: $6,784,226 (FY 2022); HIP  Boston: $5,176,619 (FY 2022); BUILD Grant: $26,250,000 (FY 2022); HIP BR: $40,000,000 (FY 2023); $111,166,667 WT Funding
2024 609531 Boston Region Arlington ARLINGTON- STRATTON SCHOOL IMPROVEMENTS (SRTS) 4 TAP $1,072,752 $1,072,752 $858,202 $214,550  
2024 610537 Boston Region Boston BOSTON- ELLIS ELEMENTARY TRAFFIC CALMING (SRTS) 6 TAP $1,047,621 $1,047,620 $838,096 $209,524  
Intersection Improvements $5,846,473 $5,261,826 $584,647  
2024 609254 Boston Region Lynn LYNN- INTERSECTION IMPROVEMENTS AT TWO INTERSECTIONS ON BROADWAY 4 HSIP $5,846,473 $5,846,473 $5,261,826 $584,647  
Year MassDOT Project ID MPO Municipality MassDOT Project Description District Funding Source Adjusted TFPC Total Programmed Funds Federal Funds Non-Federal Funds Other Information
Federal Fiscal Year 2025 $221,194,797 $184,419,520 $36,775,277  
Section 1A / Regionally Prioritized Projects $107,862,383 $86,853,079 $21,009,304  
Roadway Reconstruction $83,180,783 $67,044,626 $16,136,157  
2025 605168 Boston Region Hingham HINGHAM- IMPROVEMENTS ON ROUTE 3A FROM OTIS STREET/COLE ROAD  INCLUDING SUMMER STREET AND ROTARY; ROCKLAND STREET TO GEORGE WASHINGTON BOULEVARD.   5 STBG $15,474,200 $13,974,200 $11,179,360 $2,794,840 Construction; TAP+STBG Total Cost = $15,474,200; MPO Evaluation Score = 55; TAP Proponent = Hingham
2025 605168 Boston Region Hingham HINGHAM- IMPROVEMENTS ON ROUTE 3A FROM OTIS STREET/COLE ROAD  INCLUDING SUMMER STREET AND ROTARY; ROCKLAND STREET TO GEORGE WASHINGTON BOULEVARD.   5 TAP $15,474,200 $1,500,000 $1,200,000 $300,000 Construction; TAP+STBG Total Cost = $15,474,200; MPO Evaluation Score = 55; TAP Proponent = Hingham
2025 606226 Boston Region Boston BOSTON- RECONSTRUCTION OF RUTHERFORD AVENUE, FROM CITY SQUARE TO SULLIVAN SQUARE 6 NHPP $183,633,774 $12,000,000 $9,600,000 $2,400,000 Construction; NHPP+STBG+TAP Total Cost = $183,633,774; AC schedule over 5 years (2023-2027); Total funding in this TIP = $125,744,000; $25,000,000 in anticipated funding provided by City of Boston; MPO Evaluation Score = 59; TAP Proponent = Boston
2025 606226 Boston Region Boston BOSTON- RECONSTRUCTION OF RUTHERFORD AVENUE, FROM CITY SQUARE TO SULLIVAN SQUARE 6 STBG $183,633,774 $18,055,959 $14,444,767 $3,611,192 Construction; NHPP+STBG+TAP Total Cost = $183,633,774; AC schedule over 5 years (2023-2027); Total funding in this TIP = $125,744,000; $25,000,000 in anticipated funding provided by City of Boston; MPO Evaluation Score = 59; TAP Proponent = Boston
2025 606226 Boston Region Boston BOSTON- RECONSTRUCTION OF RUTHERFORD AVENUE, FROM CITY SQUARE TO SULLIVAN SQUARE 6 TAP $183,633,774 $2,000,000 $1,600,000 $400,000 Construction; NHPP+STBG+TAP Total Cost = $183,633,774; AC schedule over 5 years (2023-2027); Total funding in this TIP = $125,744,000; $25,000,000 in anticipated funding provided by City of Boston; MPO Evaluation Score = 59; TAP Proponent = Boston
2025 608051 Boston Region Wilmington WILMINGTON- RECONSTRUCTION ON ROUTE 38 (MAIN STREET), FROM ROUTE 62 TO THE WOBURN C.L. 4 CMAQ $25,473,225 $6,000,000 $4,800,000 $1,200,000 Construction; CMAQ+HSIP+STBG Total Cost = $25,473,225; Project has 2-year AC schedule (2025-26); MPO Evaluation Score = 59
2025 608051 Boston Region Wilmington WILMINGTON- RECONSTRUCTION ON ROUTE 38 (MAIN STREET), FROM ROUTE 62 TO THE WOBURN C.L. 4 HSIP $25,473,225 $1,000,000 $900,000 $100,000 Construction; CMAQ+HSIP+STBG Total Cost = $25,473,225; Project has 2-year AC schedule (2025-26); MPO Evaluation Score = 59
2025 608051 Boston Region Wilmington WILMINGTON- RECONSTRUCTION ON ROUTE 38 (MAIN STREET), FROM ROUTE 62 TO THE WOBURN C.L. 4 STBG $25,473,225 $2,000,000 $1,600,000 $400,000 Construction; CMAQ+HSIP+STBG Total Cost = $25,473,225; Project has 2-year AC schedule (2025-26); MPO Evaluation Score = 59
2025 609257 Boston Region Everett EVERETT- RECONSTRUCTION OF BEACHAM STREET 4 HSIP $10,545,024 $1,000,000 $900,000 $100,000 Construction; HSIP+TAP+STBG Total Cost = $10,545,024; MPO Evaluation Score = 54; TAP Proponent = Everett
2025 609257 Boston Region Everett EVERETT- RECONSTRUCTION OF BEACHAM STREET 4 STBG $10,545,024 $8,045,024 $6,436,019 $1,609,005 Construction; HSIP+TAP+STBG Total Cost = $10,545,024; MPO Evaluation Score = 54; TAP Proponent = Everett
2025 609257 Boston Region Everett EVERETT- RECONSTRUCTION OF BEACHAM STREET 4 TAP $10,545,024 $1,500,000 $1,200,000 $300,000 Construction; HSIP+TAP+STBG Total Cost = $10,545,024; MPO Evaluation Score = 54; TAP Proponent = Everett
2025 610662 Boston Region Woburn WOBURN- ROADWAY AND INTERSECTION IMPROVEMENTS AT WOBURN COMMON, ROUTE 38 (MAIN STREET), WINN STREET, PLEASANT STREET AND MONTVALE AVENUE 4 HSIP $16,105,600 $3,000,000 $2,700,000 $300,000 Construction; HSIP+STBG Total Cost = $16,105,600; MPO Evaluation Score = 75
2025 610662 Boston Region Woburn WOBURN- ROADWAY AND INTERSECTION IMPROVEMENTS AT WOBURN COMMON, ROUTE 38 (MAIN STREET), WINN STREET, PLEASANT STREET AND MONTVALE AVENUE 4 STBG $16,105,600 $13,105,600 $10,484,480 $2,621,120 Construction; HSIP+STBG Total Cost = $16,105,600; MPO Evaluation Score = 75
Intersection Improvements $10,612,800 $8,553,412 $2,059,388  
2025 605857 Boston Region Norwood NORWOOD- INTERSECTION IMPROVEMENTS AT ROUTE 1 & UNIVERSITY AVENUE/EVERETT STREET  5 CMAQ $25,757,791 $3,000,000 $2,400,000 $600,000 Construction; HSIP+CMAQ+STBG+NHPP Total Cost = $25,757,791; 2-year AC schedule (2025-26); MPO Evaluation Score = 55
2025 605857 Boston Region Norwood NORWOOD- INTERSECTION IMPROVEMENTS AT ROUTE 1 & UNIVERSITY AVENUE/EVERETT STREET  5 HSIP $25,757,791 $631,724 $568,552 $63,172 Construction; HSIP+CMAQ+STBG+NHPP Total Cost = $25,757,791; 2-year AC schedule (2025-26); MPO Evaluation Score = 55
2025 605857 Boston Region Norwood NORWOOD- INTERSECTION IMPROVEMENTS AT ROUTE 1 & UNIVERSITY AVENUE/EVERETT STREET  5 NHPP $25,757,791 $2,873,029 $2,298,423 $574,606 Construction; HSIP+CMAQ+STBG+NHPP Total Cost = $25,757,791; 2-year AC schedule (2025-26); MPO Evaluation Score = 55
2025 605857 Boston Region Norwood NORWOOD- INTERSECTION IMPROVEMENTS AT ROUTE 1 & UNIVERSITY AVENUE/EVERETT STREET  5 STBG $25,757,791 $2,495,247 $1,996,198 $499,049 Construction; HSIP+CMAQ+STBG+NHPP Total Cost = $25,757,791; 2-year AC schedule (2025-26); MPO Evaluation Score = 55
2025 608067 Boston Region Woburn WOBURN- INTERSECTION RECONSTRUCTION AT ROUTE 3 (CAMBRIDGE ROAD) & BEDFORD ROAD AND SOUTH BEDFORD STREET 4 CMAQ $1,612,800 $1,612,800 $1,290,240 $322,560 Construction; CMAQ Total Cost = $1,612,800; MPO Evaluation Score = 52
Bicycle and Pedestrian $6,568,800 $5,255,040 $1,313,760  
2025 610544 Boston Region Peabody PEABODY- MULTI-USE PATH CONSTRUCTION OF INDEPENDENCE GREENWAY AT I-95 AND ROUTE 1 4 CMAQ $6,568,800 $4,000,000 $3,200,000 $800,000 Construction; CMAQ+TAP Total Cost = $6,568,800; MPO Evaluation Score = 53; TAP Proponent = Peabody
2025 610544 Boston Region Peabody PEABODY- MULTI-USE PATH CONSTRUCTION OF INDEPENDENCE GREENWAY AT I-95 AND ROUTE 1 4 TAP $6,568,800 $2,568,800 $2,055,040 $513,760 Construction; CMAQ+TAP Total Cost = $6,568,800; MPO Evaluation Score = 53; TAP Proponent = Peabody
Flex to FTA $5,500,000 $4,400,000 $1,100,000  
2025 S12113 Boston Region   TRANSIT MODERNIZATION PROGRAM Regionwide CMAQ $11,000,000 $5,500,000 $4,400,000 $1,100,000 Construction; Flex to FTA; Set aside for LRTP Transit Modernization Program
Transit Grant Program $2,000,000 $1,600,000 $400,000  
2025 S12124 Boston Region Multiple COMMUNITY CONNECTIONS PROGRAM Regionwide CMAQ $7,522,281 $2,000,000 $1,600,000 $400,000 Planning, Design, or Construction; Set Aside for LRTP Community Connections Program
Section 2A / State Prioritized Reliability Projects $68,891,728 $58,171,740 $10,719,988  
Bridge On-system NHS $30,464,223 $24,371,378 $6,092,845  
2025 608703 Boston Region Wilmington WILMINGTON- BRIDGE REPLACEMENT, W-38-029 (2KV), ST 129 LOWELL STREET OVER I 93 4 NHPP $16,542,624 $16,542,624 $13,234,099 $3,308,525  
2025 610776 Boston Region Cambridge CAMBRIDGE- SUPERSTRUCTURE REPLACEMENT, C-01-031, US ROUTE 3/ROUTE 16/ROUTE 2 OVER MBTA REDLINE 6 NHPP $13,921,599 $13,921,599 $11,137,279 $2,784,320  
Safety Improvements $6,440,001 $5,796,001 $644,000  
2025 609532 Boston Region Chelsea CHELSEA- TARGETED SAFETY IMPROVEMENTS AND RELATED WORK ON BROADWAY, FROM WILLIAMS STREET TO CITY HALL AVENUE 6 HSIP $6,440,001 $6,440,001 $5,796,001 $644,000  
Non-Interstate Pavement $7,843,932 $6,275,146 $1,568,786  
2025 610722 Boston Region Multiple ACTON- BOXBOROUGH- LITTLETON- PAVEMENT PRESERVATION ROUTE 2 3 NHPP $7,843,932 $7,843,932 $6,275,146 $1,568,786  
Interstate Pavement $24,143,572 $21,729,215 $2,414,357  
2025 610726 Boston Region Multiple MEDFORD- WINCHESTER- STONEHAM- INTERSTATE PAVEMENT PRESERVATION ON I-93 4 NHPP-I $24,143,572 $24,143,572 $21,729,215 $2,414,357  
Section 2B / State Prioritized Modernization Projects $40,724,988 $36,422,143 $4,302,845  
Roadway Reconstruction $40,724,988 $36,422,143 $4,302,845  
2025 607977 Boston Region Multiple HOPKINTON- WESTBOROUGH- RECONSTRUCTION OF I-90/I-495 INTERCHANGE 3 NHPP-I $285,366,126 $15,000,000 $13,500,000 $1,500,000 Other FA - SW HIP: $6,784,226 (FY 2022); HIP  Boston: $5,176,619 (FY 2022); BUILD Grant: $26,250,000 (FY 2022); HIP BR: $40,000,000 (FY 2023); $111,166,667 WT Funding
2025 607977 Boston Region Multiple HOPKINTON- WESTBOROUGH- RECONSTRUCTION OF I-90/I-495 INTERCHANGE 3 NFP-I $285,366,126 $23,421,524 $21,079,372 $2,342,152 Other FA - SW HIP: $6,784,226 (FY 2022); HIP  Boston: $5,176,619 (FY 2022); BUILD Grant: $26,250,000 (FY 2022); HIP BR: $40,000,000 (FY 2023); $111,166,667 WT Funding
2025 611997 Boston Region Newton NEWTON- HORACE MANN ELEMENTARY SCHOOL IMPROVEMENTS (SRTS) 6 TAP $893,887 $893,887 $715,110 $178,777  
2025 612001 Boston Region Medford MEDFORD- MILTON FULLER ROBERTS ELEMENTARY SCHOOL (SRTS) 4 TAP $1,058,663 $1,058,663 $846,930 $211,733  
2025 612100 Boston Region Revere REVERE- IMPROVEMENTS AT BEACHMONT VETERANS ELEMENTARY (SRTS) 4 TAP $350,914 $350,914 $280,731 $70,183  
Section 2C / State Prioritized Expansion Projects $3,715,698 $2,972,558 $743,140  
Bicycle and Pedestrian $3,715,698 $2,972,558 $743,140  
2025 610680 Boston Region Natick NATICK- LAKE COCHITUATE PATH 3 CMAQ $3,715,699 $3,715,698 $2,972,558 $743,140  

 

 

Year MassDOT Project ID MPO Municipality MassDOT Project Description District Funding Source Adjusted TFPC Total Programmed Funds Federal Funds Non-Federal Funds Other Information
Federal Fiscal Year 2026 $180,904,954 $149,472,209 $31,432,745  
Section 1A / Regionally Prioritized Projects $84,712,046 $67,869,637 $16,842,409  
Intersection Improvements $16,757,791 $13,406,233 $3,351,558  
2026 605857 Boston Region Norwood NORWOOD- INTERSECTION IMPROVEMENTS AT ROUTE 1 & UNIVERSITY AVENUE/EVERETT STREET  5 STBG $25,757,791 $16,757,791 $13,406,233 $3,351,558 Construction; HSIP+CMAQ+STBG+NHPP Total Cost = $25,757,791; 2-year AC schedule (2025-26); MPO Evaluation Score = 55
Roadway Reconstruction $60,454,255 $48,463,404 $11,990,851  
2026 606226 Boston Region Boston BOSTON- RECONSTRUCTION OF RUTHERFORD AVENUE, FROM CITY SQUARE TO SULLIVAN SQUARE 6 NHPP $183,633,774 $12,000,000 $9,600,000 $2,400,000 Construction; NHPP+STBG+TAP Total Cost = $183,633,774; AC schedule over 5 years (2023-2027); Total funding in this TIP = $125,744,000; $25,000,000 in anticipated funding provided by City of Boston; MPO Evaluation Score = 59; TAP Proponent = Boston
2026 606226 Boston Region Boston BOSTON- RECONSTRUCTION OF RUTHERFORD AVENUE, FROM CITY SQUARE TO SULLIVAN SQUARE 6 STBG $183,633,774 $19,500,000 $15,600,000 $3,900,000 Construction; NHPP+STBG+TAP Total Cost = $183,633,774; AC schedule over 5 years (2023-2027); Total funding in this TIP = $125,744,000; $25,000,000 in anticipated funding provided by City of Boston; MPO Evaluation Score = 59; TAP Proponent = Boston
2026 606226 Boston Region Boston BOSTON- RECONSTRUCTION OF RUTHERFORD AVENUE, FROM CITY SQUARE TO SULLIVAN SQUARE 6 TAP $183,633,774 $2,000,000 $1,600,000 $400,000 Construction; NHPP+STBG+TAP Total Cost = $183,633,774; AC schedule over 5 years (2023-2027); Total funding in this TIP = $125,744,000; $25,000,000 in anticipated funding provided by City of Boston; MPO Evaluation Score = 59; TAP Proponent = Boston
2026 608045 Boston Region Milford MILFORD- REHABILITATION ON ROUTE 16, FROM ROUTE 109 TO BEAVER STREET 3 HSIP $10,481,030 $1,000,000 $900,000 $100,000 Construction; HSIP+STBG Total Cost = $10,481,030; MPO Evaluation Score = 43
2026 608045 Boston Region Milford MILFORD- REHABILITATION ON ROUTE 16, FROM ROUTE 109 TO BEAVER STREET 3 STBG $10,481,030 $9,481,030 $7,584,824 $1,896,206 Construction; HSIP+STBG Total Cost = $10,481,030; MPO Evaluation Score = 43
2026 608051 Boston Region Wilmington WILMINGTON- RECONSTRUCTION ON ROUTE 38 (MAIN STREET), FROM ROUTE 62 TO THE WOBURN C.L. 4 STBG $25,473,225 $16,473,225 $13,178,580 $3,294,645 Construction; CMAQ+HSIP+STBG Total Cost = $25,473,225; Project has 2-year AC schedule (2025-26); MPO Evaluation Score = 59
Flex to FTA $5,500,000 $4,400,000 $1,100,000  
2026 S12113 Boston Region   TRANSIT MODERNIZATION PROGRAM Regionwide CMAQ $11,000,000 $5,500,000 $4,400,000 $1,100,000 Construction; Flex to FTA; Set aside for LRTP Transit Modernization Program
Transit Grant Program $2,000,000 $1,600,000 $400,000  
2026 S12124 Boston Region Multiple COMMUNITY CONNECTIONS PROGRAM Regionwide CMAQ $7,522,281 $2,000,000 $1,600,000 $400,000 Planning, Design, or Construction; Set Aside for LRTP Community Connections Program
Section 2A / State Prioritized Reliability Projects $40,796,246 $33,335,557 $7,460,689  
Safety Improvements $6,985,601 $6,287,041 $698,560  
2026 607748 Boston Region Acton ACTON- INTERSECTION & SIGNAL IMPROVEMENTS ON SR 2 & SR 111 (MASSACHUSETTS AVENUE) AT PIPER ROAD & TAYLOR ROAD 3 HSIP $4,382,329 $4,382,329 $3,944,096 $438,233  
2026 611954 Boston Region Boston BOSTON- GUIDE AND TRAFFIC SIGN REPLACEMENT ON I-90/I-93 WITHIN CENTRAL ARTERY/TUNNEL SYSTEM 6 HSIP $2,603,272 $2,603,272 $2,342,945 $260,327  
Non-Interstate Pavement $22,973,988 $18,379,190 $4,594,798  
2026 609402 Boston Region Multiple FRAMINGHAM- NATICK- RESURFACING AND RELATED WORK ON ROUTE 9 3 NHPP $14,082,878 $14,082,878 $11,266,302 $2,816,576  
2026 612050 Boston Region Multiple BRAINTREE- WEYMOUTH- RESURFACING AND RELATED WORK ON ROUTE 3 6 NHPP $8,891,110 $8,891,110 $7,112,888 $1,778,222  
Bridge On-system Non-NHS $7,461,816 $5,969,453 $1,492,363  
2026 612075 Boston Region Salem SALEM- BRIDGE REPLACEMENT, S-01-024, JEFFERSON AVENUE OVER PARALLEL STREET 4 STBG $3,354,720 $3,354,720 $2,683,776 $670,944  
2026 612099 Boston Region   ASHLAND- BRIDGE REPLACEMENT, A-14-006, CORDAVILLE ROAD OVER SUDBURY RIVER 3 STBG $4,107,096 $4,107,096 $3,285,677 $821,419  
Bridge Off-system $3,374,841 $2,699,873 $674,968  
2026 612076 Boston Region Topsfield TOPSFIELD- BRIDGE REPLACEMENT, T-06-013, PERKINS ROW OVER MILE BROOK 4 STBG-BR-Off $3,374,481 $3,374,841 $2,699,873 $674,968  
Section 2B / State Prioritized Modernization Projects $43,722,726 $38,927,866 $4,794,860  
Intersection Improvements $8,430,871 $7,165,197 $1,265,674  
2026 607759 Boston Region Boston BOSTON- INTERSECTION & SIGNAL IMPROVEMENTS AT THE VFW PARKWAY & SPRING STREET 6 STBG $4,225,870 $4,225,870 $3,380,696 $845,174  
2026 610665 Boston Region Stoneham STONEHAM- INTERSECTION IMPROVEMENTS AT ROUTE 28 (MAIN STREET), NORTH BORDER ROAD AND SOUTH STREET 4 HSIP $4,205,001 $4,205,001 $3,784,501 $420,500  
Roadway Reconstruction $35,291,855 $31,762,670 $3,529,186  
2026 607977 Boston Region Multiple HOPKINTON- WESTBOROUGH- RECONSTRUCTION OF I-90/I-495 INTERCHANGE 3 NFP-I $285,366,126 $35,291,855 $31,762,670 $3,529,186 Other FA - SW HIP: $6,784,226 (FY 2022); HIP  Boston: $5,176,619 (FY 2022); BUILD Grant: $26,250,000 (FY 2022); HIP BR: $40,000,000 (FY 2023); $111,166,667 WT Funding
Section 2C / State Prioritized Expansion Projects $11,673,936 $9,339,149 $2,334,787  
Bicycle and Pedestrian $11,673,936 $9,339,149 $2,334,787  
2026 607329 Boston Region Multiple WAKEFIELD- LYNNFIELD- RAIL TRAIL EXTENSION, FROM THE GALVIN MIDDLE SCHOOL TO LYNNFIELD/PEABODY T.L. 4 CMAQ $11,673,936 $11,673,936 $9,339,149 $2,334,787  

 

Table 3-8
FFYs 2022-26 TIP Transit Table (MBTA Federal Capital Program)

Federal Funding Program ALI 2022 2023 2024 2025 2026 FFY22-26 Total (Federal) FFY22-26 Total (Incl. Match)
       
5307   $149,839,571 $152,401,827 $155,007,899 $157,658,534 $160,354,495 $775,262,326 $969,077,908
Revenue Vehicle Program  12.12.00 $117,756,381 $117,756,381 $117,756,381 $117,756,381 $117,756,381 $588,781,905 $735,977,381
Signals/Systems Upgrade Program 12.63.01 $0 $0 $0 $0 $0 $0 $0
Stations and Facilities Program  12.34.00 $32,083,190 $34,645,446 $37,251,518 $39,902,153 $42,598,114 $186,480,421 $233,100,526
       
5337   $151,084,011 $153,667,547 $156,295,263 $158,967,911 $161,686,263 $781,700,995 $977,126,244
Bridge & Tunnel Program   12.24.05 $47,231,542 $47,231,542 $47,231,542 $47,231,542 $47,231,542 $236,157,709 $295,197,136
Revenue Vehicle Program  12.12.00 $12,131,862 $12,131,862 $12,131,862 $12,131,862 $12,131,862 $60,659,309 $75,824,136
Signals/Systems Upgrade Program  12.63.01 $68,437,082 $68,437,082 $68,437,082 $68,437,082 $68,437,082 $342,185,412 $427,731,765
Stations and Facilities Program  12.34.00 $23,283,525 $25,867,061 $28,494,777 $31,167,425 $33,885,777 $142,698,565 $178,373,206
       
5339   $6,208,003 $6,314,160 $6,422,132 $6,531,951 $6,643,647 $32,119,893 $40,149,866
Bus Program  11.14.00 $6,208,003 $6,314,160 $6,422,132 $6,531,951 $6,643,647 $32,119,893 $40,149,866
                 
FFY22-26 FTA Formula Funding   $307,131,585 $312,383,534 $317,725,294 $323,158,396 $328,684,405 $1,589,083,214 $1,986,354,017
                 
5309 - GLX   $46,121,000 $0 $0 $0 $0 $46,121,000 $92,242,000
Green Line Extension  13.23.03 $46,121,000 $0 $0 $0 $0 $46,121,000 $92,242,000
       
Other Federal   $586,594,981 $316,691,912 $284,582,391 $147,500,000 $125,000,000 $1,460,369,284 $1,460,369,284
RRIF Financing - PTC/ATC/Fiber 12.63.01 $439,094,981 $169,191,912 $137,082,391 $0 $0 $745,369,284 $745,369,284
RRIF/TIFIA Financing Program 12.24.05 $147,500,000 $147,500,000 $147,500,000 $147,500,000 $125,000,000 $715,000,000 $715,000,000
       
FFY22-26 Total Federal Funding   $939,847,566 $629,075,446 $602,307,685 $470,658,396 $453,684,405 $3,095,573,498 $3,538,965,301
Note:
FTA formula funds (5307, 5337 and 5339) are based on estimated apportionments for FFY22-26.   
TIP programs and projects are based on the preliminary FY22-26 CIP and planned federal obligations as of Apr-21.  Adjustments will be made to federal projects and budgets as the FY22-26 CIP process is finalized. 
The Activity Line Item (ALI) codes are preliminary only and generally reflect the bulk of the TIP program. Within a program there may be several different ALI codes used. 
Green Line Extension funding is based on the FFGA.  $850.0M obligated to date and another $100.0M is expected to be obligated in FFY21, leaving a $46.1M balance.  
RRIF loan funding for the PTC/ATC/Fiber Resiliency project is based on the planned drawdown schedule and is subject to change.
RRIF/TIFIA financing program funding is an initial estimate and will be refined as projects are identified and loans are finalized with the Build America Bureau.

 

 

Table 3-9
FFYs 2022-26 TIP Transit Table (MBTA Federal Capital Program – Project List and Descriptions [80% Federal Share])

Funds TIP Program CIP ID# Project Name FFY 2021 FFY 2022-2026 Total (Federal) Project Description
FTA Formula Funds (5307, 5337, 5339)
5307 - Revenue Vehicles
5307 Revenue Vehicles P0369 Green Line Type 10 Light Rail Fleet Replacement $37,801,325 $321,808,529 $359,609,854 Replacement of Light Rail Vehicles to replace the existing Green Line Type 7 and 8 Fleets. 
5307 Revenue Vehicles P0653   Procurement of Battery Electric 40ft Buses and Related infrastructure $0 $41,437,713 $41,437,713 Procurement of Battery Electric 40ft Buses and Related infrastructure
5307 Revenue Vehicles P0618 Delivery of 40 ft Buses - FY 2021 to FY 2025 $0 $133,254,827 $133,254,827 Procurement of 40-foot electric and hybrid buses for replacement of diesel bus fleet.
5307 Revenue Vehicles P0619 Dual Mode Articulated (DMA) Bus Replacement $71,356,024 $0 $71,356,024 Procurement of 60-foot DMA buses to replace the existing fleet of 32 Silver Line BRT buses and to provide for ridership expansion projected as a result of Silver Line service extension to Chelsea.
5307 Revenue Vehicles P0649 Option Order Procurement of 194 New Flyer Hybrid 40 ft Buses $0 $5,844,571 $5,844,571 Procurement of 40-foot buses with hybrid propulsion to replace Emission Controlled Diesel (ECD) buses that have reached the end of their service life.
5307 Revenue Vehicles P0650 Overhaul of 33 Kawasaki 900 Series Bi-Level Coaches $4,800,000 $30,560,000 $35,360,000 Overhaul and upgrade of existing systems on commuter rail coaches that were brought into service in 2005 to enable optimal reliability through the end of their service life.
5307 Revenue Vehicles P0652 Procurement of Bi-Level Commuter Rail Coaches $0 $35,076,265 $35,076,265 Procurement of bi-level commuter rail coaches to replace existing cars that have exceeded their service life.
5307 Revenue Vehicles P0911 156 Hybrid, 175 CNG, 45 60ft Hybrid Bus Overhaul Program $0 $20,800,000 $20,800,000 Overhaul of MBTA bus fleet (hybrid and CNG)
$113,957,349 $588,781,905 $702,739,254
5307 - Stations and Facilities
5307 Stations and Facilities P0066e Harvard/Central Elevator $5,347,007 $0 $5,347,007 Elevator Improvements at Harvard/Central to address station accessibility needs.
5307 Stations and Facilities P0104 Charlestown Bus - Seawall Rehab $930,609 $0 $930,609 Rehabilitation of existing seawall to protect bus maintenance facility from future storm and flooding events.
5307 Stations and Facilities P0165 Harvard Square Busway Repairs $1,600,000 $0 $1,600,000 Rehabilitation of roadway, drainage and catenary infrastructure at the Harvard Square Busway.  
5307 Stations and Facilities P0671a Bus Facility Modernization Program - Quincy Bus Facility $111,020,540 $186,480,420 $297,500,960 Replace the existing Quincy bus facility to provide additional capacity to support future service growth and a transition to battery electric buses.  
$118,898,155 $186,480,420 $305,378,575
5337 - Bridge and Tunnel
5337 Bridge and Tunnel P0006 Gloucester Drawbridge Replacement $4,246,758 $8,156,224 $12,402,982 Replacement of Gloucester Drawbridge with two new independent/operational and functioning movable bascule bridges.
5337 Bridge and Tunnel P0008 Emergency Bridge Design / Inspection & Rating $0 $2,379,908 $2,379,908 Inspection of bridge assets system wide for determination of asset condition ratings and subsequent prioritization and scoping for repairs to select bridges.
5337 Bridge and Tunnel P0009 Bridges - Design $0 $10,480,489 $10,480,489 Design for high priority bridge repairs system wide.
5337 Bridge and Tunnel P0037 Emergency Bridge Repair $0 $2,369,753 $2,369,753 Repairs to bridges system wide, based on asset condition as determined by system wide inspections.
5337 Bridge and Tunnel P0182 Tunnel Rehab $0 $705,198 $705,198 Repair and rehabilitation of transit tunnels system wide.
5337 Bridge and Tunnel P0495 Bridge Bundling Contract $0 $47,357,564 $47,357,564 Replacement of 6 commuter rail bridges: Lynn Fells Parkway in Melrose (Haverhill Line); Parker Street in Lawrence (Haverhill Line); Commercial Street in Lynn (Newburyport/Rockport Line); Bacon Street in Wellesley (Worcester Line); Intervale Road in Weston (Worcester Line); and High Line Bridge in Somerville (Lowell Line).
5337 Bridge and Tunnel P0551 Longfellow Approach $0 $91,088,476 $91,088,476 Rehabilitation of the Longfellow Approach Viaduct, Charles/MGH Station platforms, and Span 1 of the Longfellow Bridge.
5337 Bridge and Tunnel P0627 Inspection and Rating of MBTA Systemwide Bridges $0 $43,432,800 $43,432,800 Inspection of bridge assets system wide for determination of asset condition ratings. 
5337 Bridge and Tunnel P0851 Norfolk Ave & East Cottage Street Bridges $22,173,611 $0 $22,173,611 Replacement of East Cottage Street bridge with a new superstructure and substructure to meet design code/standards, as well as MBTA and FTA State of Good Repair requirements.
5337 Bridge and Tunnel P0853 Robert Street Bridge $3,389,786 $0 $3,389,786 Replacement of bridge carrying the Needham Line Commuter Rail service over Robert Street in Roslindale.
5337 Bridge and Tunnel P0907 East Street Bridge Replacement (Dedham) $0 $14,400,000 $14,400,000 Replacement of bridge carrying the Franklin Line commuter rail service and CSX freight service over East Street in Dedham.
5337 Bridge and Tunnel R0074 Tunnel Inspection Systemwide $5,280,000 $15,787,297 $21,067,297 Inspection to assess condition of transit tunnels systemwide.
$35,090,154 $236,157,709 $271,247,864
5337 - Revenue Vehicles
5337 Revenue Vehicles P0239 Locomotive Overhaul $10,000,000 $11,906,527 $21,906,527 Overhaul of commuter rail locomotives to improve fleet availability and service reliability systemwide.
5337 Revenue Vehicles P0370 Green Line Train Protection $10,280,463 $48,752,782 $59,033,245 Installation of on-board and wayside equipment for a train monitoring system to determine allowable train separation, based on speed and location, and to prevent vehicles from passing a red signal.
$20,280,463 $60,659,309 $80,939,772
5337 - Signals and Systems
5337 Signals and Systems P0097 45 High Street - Data Center Upgrades $1,200,000 $0 $1,200,000 Includes new fire suppression/alarm system as well as power, fiber, HVAC and other data center improvements at the MBTA operations center at 45 High Street, Boston.
5337 Signals and Systems P0212 North Station Terminal Signal $0 $4,000,000 $4,000,000 Upgrades to the commuter rail signal/communication system in the North Station area required for more efficient phasing of future track alignments, including support for the future Draw1  Bridge Replacement Project.
5337 Signals and Systems P0261 Worcester Line Track Improvements Incl. 3rd Track Feasibility Study $0 $25,885,742 $25,885,742 Construction of a new three-track section on the Framingham/Worcester Commuter Rail line to improve capacity, efficiency of operations and to bring 4 stations into full ADA compliance.
5337 Signals and Systems P0283 Green Line Central Tunnel Signal - 25 Cycle $0 $4,000,000 $4,000,000 Replace 25Hz track circuits and related equipment within the Green Line central tunnel system.
5337 Signals and Systems P0285 Signal Program - Red/Orange Line $37,768,206 $72,194,222 $109,962,427 Various signal upgrades and improvements along both the Red and Orange Lines.
5337 Signals and Systems P0301 System-Wide Radio $30,039,735 $21,030,405 $51,070,140 Replacement of existing radio system for MBTA Police to support critical two-way communication for MBTA Transit Police and to support a secure and Interoperable Radio System.
5337 Signals and Systems P0591 Green Line Central Tunnel Track and Signal Replacement $0 $96,000,000 $96,000,000 Replacement of the existing 25 cycle signal system and associated wayside equipment at Government Center, Copley and Park Street Interlockings, and related track work.
5337 Signals and Systems P0654 Red Line Interlock Upgrades $9,600,000 $0 $9,600,000 Replacement of existing interlocking signal components on the Red Line to bring the assets to a state of good repair.
5337 Signals and Systems P0705 Power Systems Resiliency Program $0 $11,416,644 $11,416,644 Installation of new duct bank systems to replace damaged power infrastructure, including at West Fourth Street, Dudley Square, Arlington Street, Causeway Street, two locations on Commonwealth Ave and three locations on Beacon Street.
5337 Signals and Systems P0857 Mattapan HSL Transformation $0 $94,400,000 $94,400,000 State of good repair and accessibility improvements to all stations, improvements to the power infrastructure, strengthening of corridor bridges, improvements to corridor drainage, and other infrastructure improvements.
5337 Signals and Systems P0904 Systemwide Asset Management Program Phase 3 $2,800,000 $6,000,000 $8,800,000 Support the MBTA's asset management program in order to meet legislative requirements; including updates to the asset inventory for Transit Asset Management Plan (TAMP) and National Transit Database (NTD) reporting.
5337 Signals and Systems R0117 Alewife Crossing Improvements $0 $7,258,400 $7,258,400 As part of the Red/Orange Line Infrastructure Improvement Program, this project will upgrade of track switches at Alewife Station and associated retrofits to accomodate these new components.
$81,407,941 $342,185,412 $423,593,353
5337 - Stations and Facilities
5337 Stations and Facilities P0003 Green Line B-Branch Consolidation $23,422,633 $0 $23,422,633 Addressing accessibility issues along the B branch of the Green Line along Commonwealth Avenue.
5337 Stations and Facilities P0066 Elevator Program $0 $12,405,121 $12,405,121 Installation of new redundant elevators and the replacement of existing elevators at various stations, in order to mitigate degradation of station elevators and to maintain station accessibility during elevator maintenance.
5337 Stations and Facilities P0074 Downtown Crossing Vertical Transportation Improvements Phase 2 $0 $5,926,390 $5,926,390 Construction of two new redundant elevators, in order to improve accessibility and to provide for future elevator maintenance without rendering the station temporarily inaccessible.
5337 Stations and Facilities P0075 Elevator Program Multiple Location Design $9,499,338 $27,035,682 $36,535,020 Design for the installation of new redundant elevators and the replacement of existing elevators system wide.
5337 Stations and Facilities P0078 Hingham Ferry Dock Modification $400,000 $0 $400,000 Capital improvements and modifications to the existing ferry dock in Hingham.
5337 Stations and Facilities P0087 Braintree and Quincy Adams Garage Rehab $9,295,936 $0 $9,295,936 The full repair and rehabilitation of the Red Line’s Quincy Adams Station and Braintree Station parking garages.
5337 Stations and Facilities P0129 Newton Highlands Green Line Station Accessibility Project $0 $25,642,761 $25,642,761 Improvements at Newton Highlands station on the D branch of the Green Line to comply with ADA accessibility standards. 
5337 Stations and Facilities P0163 Forest Hills Improvement Project $0 $26,089,763 $26,089,763 Improvements at Forest Hills Station on the Orange Line and Needham Commuter Rail Line to comply with ADA accessibility standards.  Work will also include infrastructure and other improvements. 
5337 Stations and Facilities P0168 Symphony Station Improvements $37,436,159 $0 $37,436,159 Upgrades to the existing Symphony Station on the Green Line in order to provide a modern, accessible, code-compliant facility.
5337 Stations and Facilities P0496 Silver Line Gateway - Phase 2 $0 $4,654,574 $4,654,574 Includes the building of a new commuter rail station adjacent to the new Chelsea Bus Rapid Transit (BRT) Station located at the Mystic Mall, as well as decommissioning of the existing Chelsea Commuter Rail Station and signal prioritization.
5337 Stations and Facilities P0679 Codman Yard Expansion and Improvements $43,822,058 $12,088,880 $55,910,938 Infrastructure improvements to Codman Yard, an additional Red Line storage facility, to accommodate the new vehicle fleet.
5337 Stations and Facilities P0856 Ruggles Station Improvements Phase 2 $2,599,003 $0 $2,599,003 Design for state of good repair improvements to Ruggles Station on the Orange Line.
5337 Stations and Facilities P0890 Green Line Surface Station Accessibility I $0 $15,624,828 $15,624,828 Reconstruction of Green Line surface stations and related infrastructure to support compliance with ADA regulations and alignment with corridor capacity needs.
5337 Stations and Facilities P0970 Attleboro Station Improvements $1,371,330 $0 $1,371,330 State of good repair and accessibility improvements to the Attleboro commuter rail station, in coordination with GATRA for project funding and scope development.
5337 Stations and Facilities R0071 Lynn Station & Parking Garage Improvements Phase II $0 $13,230,567 $13,230,567 Extensive rehabilitation efforts include reconstruction of the existing commuter rail platform, upgrade of mechanical and electrical systems at the station, and structural repairs and code compliance retrofits to the garage. 
$127,846,458 $142,698,565 $270,545,023
5339 - Bus and Bus Facility
5339 Bus and Bus Facilities P0653   Procurement of Battery Electric 40ft Buses and Related infrastructure $6,106,394 $32,119,893 $38,226,287 Procurement of Battery Electric 40ft Buses and Related infrastructure
$6,106,394 $32,119,893 $38,226,287
Note: Project descriptions and dollar amounts are preliminary only and are provided for informational purposes.  In many cases, the scopes of work and project budgets will become more fully developed as the design process proceeds and is completed.  The MBTA may also opt to fund a project from a different FTA funding source based on the timing of projects and the availability of FTA funds.
RRIF/TIFIA Financing Program
Projects Potentially Funded by Federal RRIF/TIFIA Loans
RRIF/TIFIA Financing P0671a Bus Facility Modernization Program - Quincy Bus Facility  
RRIF/TIFIA Financing P0551 Longfellow Approach  
RRIF/TIFIA Financing P0552 Dorchester Avenue Bridge             
RRIF/TIFIA Financing P0952 Widett Layover Facility - Real Estate and Design
RRIF/TIFIA Financing P0018 North Station Draw 1 Bridge Replacement 
RRIF/TIFIA Financing P0170 Newton Commuter Rail Stations  
RRIF/TIFIA Financing P0178 South Attleboro Station Improvements    
RRIF/TIFIA Financing P0863 South-Side CR Maintenance Facility  
 
Note: The MBTA is exploring the use of federal loans through the Build America Bureau to finance certain capital projects at a lower interest rate than traditional tax-exempt bonds.  This includes loans under the Railroad Rehabilitation & Improvement Financing (RRIF) and Transportation Infrastructure Finance and Innovation Act (TIFIA) programs.  The projects listed above are being considered for this program, subject to the approval of funding through the CIP process.   Additional project and funding information will be provided through a future TIP/Amendment if federal grant funds or loans are utilized.

 

 

 

Table 3-10
FFYs 2022-26 TIP Transit Table (MWRTA)

Project Number RTA Program Project Title Notes Fiscal Year  Total  State Funds Federal | FTA | Section 5307 Federal | FTA | Section 5339 Federal | FHWA | Transportation Development Credits Other Federal Other Non-Federal
FFY 2022        
RTD0009269 MWRTA Transit | RTA vehicle replacement METROWEST RTA/REVENUE VEHICLE REPLACEMENT  MWRTA BUY REPLACEMENT VEHICLES; 7 D(b) - CNGs
2022 $75,000 $15,000 $60,000 $0 $0 $0 $0
RTD0010209 MWRTA Transit | RTA facility and system modernization METROWEST RTA/ACQUISITION OF BUS SUPPORT EQUIP/FACILITIES METROWEST RTA/ACQUIRE AFTER MARKET VEHICLE ACCESSORIES (i.e., passenger counters, DVR - vehicle recorders, annunciators) 2022 $103,750 $20,750 $83,000 $0 $0 $0 $0
RTD0009271 MWRTA Transit | RTA replacement facilities METROWEST RTA/FEB - Front Entrance Blandin - Project Front Entrance Blandin (FEB) Project- This project is in support of the State of Good Repair for Blandin Ave Facility and accomplishes a number of the recommendations as laid out in the 5 year Comprehensive Regional Transit Plan (CRTP). Year 2 of funding allows MWRTA to complete the project, which began with FY2020 100% RTA Cap funds, allowing us to fully leverage the current investment by MassDOT. 2022 $721,100 $0 $0 $0 $0 $0 $721,100
RTD0010002 MWRTA   METROWEST RTA/OPERATING ASSISTANCE NON FIXED ROUTE ADA PARA SERV METROWEST RTA/OPERATING ASSISTANCE NON FIXED ROUTE ADA PARA SERV 2022 $2,000,000 $400,000 $1,600,000 $0 $0 $0 $0
RTD0010003 MWRTA Transit | RTA facility and vehicle maintenance METROWEST RTA/TERMINAL, INTERMODAL (TRANSIT) - BLANDIN MWRTA will utilize these funds to maintain a State of Good Repair value of at least 3.5 for the operations and administration facility along with all amenities and support equipment located at 15 Blandin Ave, Framingham MA  2022 $612,934 $122,587 $490,347 $0 $0 $0 $0
RTD0010015 MWRTA Transit | RTA facility and vehicle maintenance METROWEST RTA/TERMINAL, INTERMODAL (TRANSIT) - Framingham Commuter Rail Station (FCRS) Framingham Intermodal Enhancements/Improvements; MWRTA applies for competitive funding for this line item as well and will reduce the RTACAP request upon award of additional funds; $100,000 Pearl Street Garage Feasibility Study; $50,000 Chrish Walsh Rail Trail Signal Crossing to bring Rail Trail into MWRTA Lot (MWRTA Crossing on the Y). 2022 $5,000 $1,000 $4,000 $0 $0 $0 $0
RTD0010004 MWRTA Transit | RTA facility and vehicle maintenance METROWEST RTA/TECHNOLOGY SUPPORT/CAPITAL OUTREACH Mobility Management; IT; Call Center; Travel Training Enhancements/Improvements; MWRTA applies for competitive funding for this line item as well and will reduce the RTACAP request upon award of additional federal funds. 2022 $75,000 $15,000 $60,000 $0 $0 $0 $0
RTD0010336 MWRTA   MWRTA - Vehicle replacement - Cutaways (11) Vehicle replacement - Cutaways (11) 2022 $1,043,992 $0 $0 $0 $260,998 $1,043,992 $0
RTD0010155 MWRTA Transit | RTA facility and system modernization METROWEST RTA/2022 AFC TRANSITION - ACQUIRE - MOBILE FARE COLL EQUIP Strategy: MWRTA will be working with our technology consultant to implement account based on board fare collection option for customers. This system will allow customers to board the vehicle using a MWRTA issued smart card or MWRTA branded application via QR code which will be linked to a back-end account for the customer. The system will utilize off the shelf components, such as tablets and HID Standard readers, and will integrate into MWRTA’s existing cashless fare system being used for paratransit. This account-based system will be an additional option to customers on top of the current S&B options available (cash or Charlie card) and will allow for MWRTA to issue more flexible fare products to customer, along with integrating demand response fare collection with Fixed Route, allowing for seamless transfers across these different modes. This system will be developed to be flexible to work with AFC 2.0 initiatives of the CharlieCard when APIs are published and available for use by RTAs. The RTA Cap request is for the associated hardware to support this initiative. 2022 $150,000 $75,000 $75,000 $0 $0 $0 $0
FFY 2023        
RTD0010005 MWRTA   METROWEST RTA/OPERATING ASSISTANCE NON FIXED ROUTE ADA PARA SERV METROWEST RTA/OPERATING ASSISTANCE NON FIXED ROUTE ADA PARA SERV
2023 $2,000,000 $400,000 $1,600,000 $0 $0 $0 $0
RTD0010006 MWRTA Transit | RTA facility and vehicle maintenance METROWEST RTA/ACQUISITION OF BUS SUPPORT EQUIP/FACILITIES METROWEST RTA/ACQUIRE AFTER MARKET VEHICLE ACCESSORIES (i.e., passenger counters, DVR - vehicle recorders, annunciators) 2023 $99,750 $19,950 $79,800 $0 $0 $0 $0
RTD0010007 MWRTA Transit | RTA facility and vehicle maintenance METROWEST RTA/TECHNOLOGY SUPPORT/CAPITAL OUTREACH Mobility Management; IT; Call Center; Travel Training Enhancements/Improvements; Fare Collection Transition;MWRTA applies for competitive funding for this line item as well and will reduce the RTACAP request upon award of additional federal funds.

2023 $100,000 $20,000 $80,000 $0 $0 $0 $0
RTD0010014 MWRTA Transit | RTA facility and vehicle maintenance METROWEST RTA/TERMINAL, INTERMODAL (TRANSIT) - Framingham Commuter Rail Station (FCRS) Framingham Intermodal Enhancements/Improvements; MWRTA applies for competitive funding for this line item as well and will reduce the RTACAP request upon award of additional federal funds.
2023 $5,000 $1,000 $4,000 $0 $0 $0 $0
RTD0010008 MWRTA Transit | RTA facility and vehicle maintenance METROWEST RTA/TERMINAL, INTERMODAL (TRANSIT) - BLANDIN MWRTA will utilize these funds to maintain a State of Good Repair value of at least 3.5 for the operations and administration facility along with all amenities and support equipment located at 15 Blandin Ave, Framingham MA
2023 $312,500 $62,500 $250,000 $0 $0 $0 $0
RTD0010020 MWRTA Transit | RTA vehicle replacement METROWEST RTA/REVENUE VEHICLE REPLACEMENT MWRTA BUY REPLACEMENT VEHICLES; 6 D(b)CNGs + 6 E2s Gas
2023 $495,000 $165,000 $0 $0 $0 $330,000 $0
RTD0010334 MWRTA   MWRTA - Electronic Sign Board MWRTA - Electronic Sign Board 2023 $200,000 $40,000 $160,000 $0 $0 $0 $0
RTD0010330 MWRTA   MWRTA - BEB - Back Entrance Blandin Project MWRTA - BEB - Back Entrance Blandin Project 2023 $2,000,000 $400,000 $0 $0 $0 $1,600,000 $0
RTD0010333 MWRTA   MWRTA - CRT North Framingham Bike/Pedestrian Connectivity - Cochituate Rail Trail North Framingham Feasibility Study MWRTA - CRT North Framingham Bike/Pedestrian Connectivity - Cochituate Rail Trail North Framingham Feasibility Study 2023 $95,000 $19,000 $0 $0 $0 $76,000 $0
RTD0010338 MWRTA   MWRTA - Vehicle Replacement - Cutaways (12) #2 of 2 MWRTA - Vehicle Replacement - Cutaways (12) #2 of 2 2023 $495,000 $165,000 $0 $0 $0 $330,000 $0
RTD0010169 MWRTA Transit | RTA facility and system modernization METROWEST RTA/2023 ELECTRIC VEHICLE MIGRATION  Modernization Fleet Electrification - Vehicle Migration - Purchase of 5 Paratransit (Type A) Electric Vehicles. MWRTA is seeking a 8 year migration to fully electric vehicles. This request is supported in our TAM to maintain useful life benchmarks of our paratransit fleet and is in support of Gov. Baker's 2020 Transportation Climate Initiative (TCI). 2023 $300,000 $150,000 $150,000 $0 $0 $0 $0
FFY 2024        
RTD0010009 MWRTA   METROWEST RTA/OPERATING ASSISTANCE NON FIXED ROUTE ADA PARA SERV METROWEST RTA/OPERATING ASSISTANCE NON FIXED ROUTE ADA PARA SERV 2024 $2,000,000 $400,000 $1,600,000 $0 $0 $0 $0
RTD0010010 MWRTA Transit | RTA facility and vehicle maintenance METROWEST RTA/ACQUISITION OF BUS SUPPORT EQUIP/FACILITIES METROWEST RTA/ACQUIRE AFTER MARKET VEHICLE ACCESSORIES (i.e., passenger counters, DVR - vehicle recorders, annunciators) 2024 $111,750 $22,350 $89,400 $0 $0 $0 $0
RTD0010011 MWRTA Transit | RTA facility and vehicle maintenance METROWEST RTA/TECHNOLOGY SUPPORT/CAPITAL OUTREACH Mobility Management; IT; Call Center; Travel Training Enhancements/Improvements; MWRTA applies for competitive funding for this line item as well and will reduce the RTACAP request upon award of additional federal funds. 2024 $200,000 $40,000 $160,000 $0 $0 $0 $0
RTD0010012 MWRTA Transit | RTA facility and vehicle maintenance METROWEST RTA/TERMINAL, INTERMODAL (TRANSIT) - BLANDIN MWRTA will utilize these funds to maintain a State of Good Repair value of at least 3.5 for the operations and administration facility along with all amenities and support equipment located at 15 Blandin Ave, Framingham MA 2024 $312,500 $62,500 $250,000 $0 $0 $0 $0
RTD0010013 MWRTA Transit | RTA facility and vehicle maintenance METROWEST RTA/TERMINAL, INTERMODAL (TRANSIT) - Framingham Commuter Rail Station (FCRS)  Intermodal at the Framingham Commuter Rail Station (FCRS) Enhancements/Improvements;MWRTA applies for competitive funding for this line item as well and will reduce the RTACAP request upon award of additional federal funds.  2024 $5,000 $1,000 $4,000 $0 $0 $0 $0
RTD0010022 MWRTA Transit | RTA vehicle replacement METROWEST RTA/REVENUE VEHICLE REPLACEMENT MWRTA BUY REPLACEMENT VEHICLES; 11 D(b) - CNGs + 4 E2s - Gas
2024 $675,000 $225,000 $0 $0 $0 $450,000 $0
RTD0010329 MWRTA   MWRTA - FCRS Intermodal Hub MWRTA - FCRS Intermodal Hub 2024 $8,000,000 $0 $0 $0 $2,000,000 $8,000,000 $0
RTD0010331 MWRTA   MWRTA - ESG - East Street Garage Project MWRTA - ESG - East Street Garage Project 2024 $7,000,000 $0 $0 $0 $1,750,000 $7,000,000 $0
RTD0010328 MWRTA   MWRTA - Body Shop MWRTA - Body Shop 2024 $3,000,000 $0 $0 $0 $750,000 $3,000,000 $0
RTD0010340 MWRTA   MWRTA - Vehicle Replacement - Cutaways (15) #2 of 2 MWRTA - Vehicle Replacement - Cutaways (15) #2 of 2 2024 $675,000 $225,000 $0 $0 $0 $450,000 $0
RTD0010170 MWRTA Transit | RTA facility and system modernization METROWEST RTA/2024 ELECTRIC VEHICLE MIGRATION  Modernization Fleet Electrification - Vehicle Migration - Purchase of 5 Electric Vehicles 2024 $600,000 $300,000 $300,000 $0 $0 $0 $0
FFY 2025        
RTD0010016 MWRTA Transit | RTA facility and vehicle maintenance METROWEST RTA/ACQUISITION OF BUS SUPPORT EQUIP/FACILITIES METROWEST RTA/ACQUIRE AFTER MARKET VEHICLE ACCESSORIES (i.e., passenger counters, DVR - vehicle recorders, annunciators) 2025 $113,750 $22,750 $91,000 $0 $0 $0 $0
RTD0010017 MWRTA Transit | RTA facility and vehicle maintenance METROWEST RTA/TECHNOLOGY SUPPORT/CAPITAL OUTREACH Mobility Management; IT; Call Center; Travel Training Enhancements/Improvements; MWRTA applies for competitive funding for this line item as well and will reduce the RTACAP request upon award of additional federal funds. 2025 $200,000 $40,000 $160,000 $0 $0 $0 $0
RTD0010018 MWRTA Transit | RTA facility and vehicle maintenance METROWEST RTA/TERMINAL, INTERMODAL (TRANSIT) - BLANDIN MWRTA will utilize these funds to maintain a State of Good Repair value of at least 3.5 for the operations and administration facility along with all amenities and support equipment located at 15 Blandin Ave, Framingham MA 2025 $562,500 $112,500 $450,000 $0 $0 $0 $0
RTD0010019 MWRTA   METROWEST RTA/OPERATING ASSISTANCE NON FIXED ROUTE ADA PARA SERV METROWEST RTA/OPERATING ASSISTANCE NON FIXED ROUTE ADA PARA SERV 2025 $2,000,000 $400,000 $1,600,000 $0 $0 $0 $0
RTD0010023 MWRTA Transit | RTA vehicle replacement METROWEST RTA/REVENUE VEHICLE REPLACEMENT MWRTA BUY REPLACEMENT VEHICLES; 3 D(b) - CNGs + 5 E2s - Gas 2025 $375,000 $125,000 $250,000 $0 $0 $0 $0
RTD0008997 MWRTA Transit | RTA facility and vehicle maintenance METROWEST RTA/TERMINAL, INTERMODAL (TRANSIT) - Framingham Commuter Rail Station (FCRS) Framingham Intermodal Enhancements/Improvements; MWRTA applies for competitive funding for this line item as well and will reduce the RTACAP request upon award of additional federal funds.  2025 $5,000 $1,000 $4,000 $0 $0 $0 $0
RTD0010335 MWRTA   MWRTA - AFC TRANSITION - MOBILE FARE COLL EQUIP MWRTA - AFC TRANSITION - MOBILE FARE COLL EQUIP 2025 $100,000 $50,000 $50,000 $0 $0 $0 $0
RTD0010342 MWRTA   MWRTA - Vehicle Replacement - Cutaways (8) #2 of 2 MWRTA - Vehicle Replacement - Cutaways (8) #2 of 2 2025 $375,000 $125,000 $0 $250,000 $0 $0 $0
RTD0010332 MWRTA   MWRTA - Public Restrooms at Blandin and FCRS Hubs MWRTA - Public Restrooms at Blandin and FCRS Hubs 2025 $200,000 $40,000 $0 $0 $0 $160,000 $0
RTD0010171 MWRTA Transit | RTA facility and system modernization METROWEST RTA/2025 ELECTRIC VEHICLE MIGRATION  Modernization Fleet Electrification - Vehicle Migration - Purchase of 5 Paratransit (Type A) Electric Vehicles. MWRTA is seeking a 8 year migration to fully electric vehicles. This request is supported in our TAM to maintain useful life benchmarks of our paratransit fleet and is in support of Gov. Baker's 2020 Transportation Climate Initiative (TCI). 2025 $600,000 $300,000 $300,000 $0 $0 $0 $0
FFY 2026        
RTD0010161 MWRTA   METROWEST RTA/OPERATING ASSISTANCE NON FIXED ROUTE ADA PARA SERV METROWEST RTA/OPERATING ASSISTANCE NON FIXED ROUTE ADA PARA SERV 2026 $2,000,000 $400,000 $1,600,000 $0 $0 $0 $0
RTD0010163 MWRTA Transit | RTA facility and vehicle maintenance METROWEST RTA/TERMINAL, INTERMODAL (TRANSIT) - BLANDIN MWRTA will utilize these funds to maintain a State of Good Repair value of at least 3.5 for the operations and administration facility along with all amenities and support equipment located at 15 Blandin Ave, Framingham MA 2026 $687,500 $137,500 $550,000 $0 $0 $0 $0
RTD0010165 MWRTA Transit | RTA facility and vehicle maintenance METROWEST RTA/TECHNOLOGY SUPPORT/CAPITAL OUTREACH Mobility Management; IT; Call Center; Travel Training Enhancements/Improvements; MWRTA applies for competitive funding for this line item as well and will reduce the RTACAP request upon award of additional federal funds. 2026 $200,000 $40,000 $160,000 $0 $0 $0 $0
RTD0010166 MWRTA Transit | RTA facility and vehicle maintenance METROWEST RTA/ACQUISITION OF BUS SUPPORT EQUIP/FACILITIES METROWEST RTA/ACQUIRE AFTER MARKET VEHICLE ACCESSORIES (i.e., passenger counters, DVR - vehicle recorders, annunciators) 2026 $113,750 $22,750 $91,000 $0 $0 $0 $0
RTD0010167 MWRTA Transit | RTA facility and vehicle maintenance METROWEST RTA/TERMINAL, INTERMODAL (TRANSIT) - Framingham Commuter Rail Station Intermodal at the Framingham Commuter Rail Station (FCRS) Enhancements/Improvements;MWRTA applies for competitive funding for this line item as well and will reduce the RTACAP request upon award of additional federal funds. 2026 $5,000 $1,000 $4,000 $0 $0 $0 $0
RTD0010172 MWRTA Transit | RTA facility and system modernization METROWEST RTA/2026 ELECTRIC VEHICLE MIGRATION  Modernization Fleet Electrification - Vehicle Migration - Purchase of 5 Paratransit (Type A) Electric Vehicles. MWRTA is seeking a 8 year migration to fully electric vehicles. This request is supported in our TAM to maintain useful life benchmarks of our paratransit fleet and is in support of Gov. Baker's 2020 Transportation Climate Initiative (TCI). 2026 $300,000 $150,000 $150,000 $0 $0 $0 $0
RTD0010344 MWRTA   MWRTA - Vehicle Replacement - Cutaways (8) #2 of 2 MWRTA - Vehicle Replacement - Cutaways (8) #2 of 2 2026 $375,000 $125,000 $0 $0 $0 $250,000 $0
RTD0010196 MWRTA Transit | RTA vehicle replacement METROWEST RTA/REVENUE VEHICLE REPLACEMENT  MWRTA BUY REPLACEMENT VEHICLES; 6 D(b) - CNGs + 2 E2s - Gas 2026 $375,000 $125,000 $250,000 $0 $0 $0 $0

 

 

Table 3-11
FFYs 2022-26 TIP Transit Table (CATA)

Project Number RTA Program Project Title Notes Fiscal Year  Total  Bond Cap | State | 100% State Federal | FTA | Section 5307 Other | Municipal and Local | Transit
FFY 2022
RTD0009507 Cape Ann Transit | RTA facility and vehicle maintenance Cape Ann TA-buy misc small capital Miscellaneous small capital items 2022 $15,000 $15,000 $0 $0
RTD0009501 Cape Ann Transit | RTA facility and vehicle maintenance Cape Ann TA-Preventive Maintenance Preventive maintenance 2022 $356,250 $0 $285,000 $71,250
RTD0009502 Cape Ann Transit | RTA facility and system modernization Cape Ann TA-acquire shop equip/small capital Shop equipment, computers, software 2022 $37,500 $7,500 $30,000 $0
FFY 2023
RTD0009503 Cape Ann Transit | RTA facility and vehicle maintenance Cape Ann TA-Preventive Maintenance Preventive maintenance 2023 $356,250 $0 $285,000 $71,250
RTD0007185 Cape Ann Transit | RTA facility and vehicle maintenance Cape Ann TA-acquire shop equip/small capital IT equipment, shop equipment, etc. 2023 $37,500 $7,500 $30,000 $0
RTD0009504 Cape Ann Transit | RTA vehicle replacement Cape Ann TA-Revenue Vehicle Replacement - 2 This project is the replacement of two 2010 30-ft low floor buses that reached the end of their useful life in 2020 (10-year ULB). The vehicles purchased with these fund will be off the 2020 MVRTA Heavy-Duty Bus Procurement, which CATA participated in.

The project supports CATA's Transit Asset Management Program by keeping assets in a state of good repair and investing in assets before the asset's condition deteriorates to an unacceptable level.

CATA has included a 50/50 5307/RTACAP match for this project. CATA typically receives ~$500k in 5307 funds each year and $285k is programmed for PM, leaving a balance of $215K for all other capital projects.
2023 $900,000 $450,000 $450,000 $0
RTD0009508 Cape Ann Transit | RTA facility and vehicle maintenance Cape Ann TA-buy misc small capital Miscellaneous small capital items 2023 $15,000 $15,000 $0 $0
FFY 2024
RTD0009505 Cape Ann Transit | RTA facility and vehicle maintenance Cape Ann TA-Preventive Maintenance Preventive maintenance 2024 $356,250 $0 $285,000 $71,250
RTD0009506 Cape Ann Transit | RTA facility and vehicle maintenance Cape Ann TA-repave admin/ops facility parking lot Repave parking lot at administration and operations facility. Lot was last paved in the early 2000s during building rehabilitation 2024 $180,000 $36,000 $144,000 $0
RTD0009509 Cape Ann Transit | RTA facility and vehicle maintenance Cape Ann TA-buy misc small capital Miscellaneous small capital items 2024 $15,000 $15,000 $0 $0
RTD0009512 Cape Ann Transit | RTA facility and system modernization Cape Ann TA - AFC 2.0  AFC 2.0 for RTAs 2024 $300,000 $300,000 $0 $0
RTD0010077 Cape Ann Transit | RTA facility and system modernization Cape Ann TA-acquire shop equip/small capital IT equipment, shop equipment, etc. 2024 $37,500 $7,500 $30,000 $0
FFY 2025
RTD0009510 Cape Ann Transit | RTA facility and vehicle maintenance Cape Ann TA-Preventive Maintenance PM activities 2025 $356,250 $0 $285,000 $71,250
RTD0009511 Cape Ann Transit | RTA facility and vehicle maintenance Cape Ann TA-acquire shop equip/small capital IT equipment, shop equipment, etc. 2025 $37,500 $7,500 $30,000 $0
RTD0009482 Cape Ann Transit | RTA vehicle replacement Cape Ann TA-Revenue Vehicle Replacement - 2 Replacement of 2015 International body-on-chassis vehicles.

This project is the replacement of two 2015 29-ft body-on-chassis buses that reached the end of their useful life in 2022 (7 year life).

CATA has not identified a procurement for the purchase of the vehicles. The project supports CATA's Transit Asset Management Program by keeping assets in a state of good repair and investing in assets before the asset's condition deteriorates to an unacceptable level. CATA has included 100% RTACAP funding for this project as a placeholder until funding availability is more concrete, which depends on CARES Act, SCA, and 5307.  CATA typically receives ~$500k in 5307 funds each year and $285k is programmed for PM, leaving a balance of $215K for all other capital projects. 
2025 $600,000 $600,000 $0 $0
RTD0009513 Cape Ann Transit | RTA vehicle replacement Cape Ann TA-Revenue Vehicle Replacement - 1 This project is the replacement of one 2012 30-ft low floor bus that reached the end of its useful life in 2022 (10-year ULB). The vehicle purchased with these funds will be off the MVRTA Heavy-Duty Bus Procurement, which CATA participated in.

The project supports CATA's Transit Asset Management Program by keeping assets in a state of good repair and investing in assets before the asset's condition deteriorates to an unacceptable level.

CATA has included a 50/50 5307/RTACAP match for this project. CATA typically receives ~$500k in 5307 funds each year and $285k are programmed for PM, leaving a balance of $215K for all other capital projects.
2025 $450,000 $225,000 $225,000 $0
FFY 2026
RTD0009480 Cape Ann Transit | RTA facility and vehicle maintenance Cape Ann TA-Preventive Maintenance PM activities 2026 $356,250 $0 $285,000 $71,250
RTD0009481 Cape Ann Transit | RTA vehicle replacement Cape Ann TA-Revenue Vehicle Replacement - 4 Replacement of 2016 International body-on-chassis vehicles.

This project is the replacement of four 2016 29-ft body-on-chassis buses that reached the end of their useful life in 2023 (7 year life).

CATA has not identified a procurement for the purchase of the vehicles. The project supports CATA's Transit Asset Management Program by keeping assets in a state of good repair and investing in assets before the asset's condition deteriorates to an unacceptable level. CATA has included 100% RTACAP funding for this project as a placeholder until funding availability is more concrete, which depends on CARES Act, SCA, and 5307.  CATA typically receives ~$500k in 5307 funds each year and $285k is programmed for PM, leaving a balance of $215K for all other capital projects. 
2026 $1,200,000 $1,200,000 $0 $0

 


 

detailed project descriptions

3.2.1   Field Definitions

Proponent: This field lists the primary advocate for each project, who is responsible for seeing the project through to completion.

 

ID Number: This number references the project’s identification number in MassDOT’s project-tracking system.

 

Project Type: This field provides the type of project programmed. For those projects programmed with Regional Target funds (projects listed in Section 1A of the TIP tables), the projects are categorized according to the MPO’s six investment programs (Bicycle and Pedestrian, Complete Streets, Intersection Improvements, Major Infrastructure, Community Connections, and Transit Modernization). For those projects programmed directly by MassDOT (projects listed in Sections 1B, 2A, 2B, and 2C), MassDOT’s STIP Program categories are applied.

 

Cost: This is the total project cost as programmed in the TIP across all fiscal years, including years outside of FFYs 2022–26.

 

Funding Source: This identifies whether a project is funded using the MPO’s Regional Target funds or MassDOT’s statewide highway funds.

 

Scoring Summary: This table shows the number of points awarded to the project across each of the MPO’s project evaluation categories. MPO staff has not evaluated all projects in the TIP; staff only evaluates projects that are being considered for funding with the MPO’s Regional Target funds. The field definitions for the tables are as follows:

 

 

As mentioned in Chapter 2, the MPO adopted a revised set of project selection criteria in October 2020. These new criteria were used to score new projects under consideration for funding using the MPO’s Regional Target funds this year. The point allocations detailed above are those that were in effect under the prior scoring system, as no new projects were selected for funding in the FFYs 2022–26 TIP through the MPO’s Bicycle and Pedestrian, Complete Streets, Intersection Improvements, and Major Infrastructure investment programs. Updates were made to the criteria for the MPO’s Community Connections Program; the scoring summary field denotes whether each of these projects was scored under the original or revised criteria. Further details on all of the MPO’s project selection criteria are available in Appendix A.

 

Project Description: The description of the project is based, in part, on the written description of the project on MassDOT’s Project Information website. In some cases, these descriptions have been modified to clarify the details of the projects. Projects evaluated by the MPO tend to have more detailed descriptions, as more complete project documentation was provided to MPO staff for these projects.

 

Funding Summary: Funding tables are included for each project and show the following information:

 

 

For more information on all projects please visit MassDOT’s Project Information website, https://hwy.massdot.state.ma.us/projectinfo/projectinfo.asp, the Boston Region MPO’s website, www.bostonmpo.org, or contact Matt Genova, TIP Manager, at mgenova@ctps.org.

 

Acton: Intersection Improvements at Massachusetts Avenue (Route 111) and Main Street (Route 27) (Kelley’s Corner)

Proponent:          Acton

ID Number:        608229

Project Type:       Intersection Improvements

Cost:                  $15,311,125

Funding Source:  Regional Target Funds

Scoring Summary

Category

Safety

Sys Pres

CM/M

CA/SC

TE

EV

Total

Score

15 out of 30

8 out of 29

10 out of 29

8 out of 16

0 out of 12

4 out of 18

45 out of 134

 

Project Description

This project involves improvements to address traffic congestion and the safety of pedestrians and bicyclists through the addition of turning lanes and the reduction and consolidation of curb cuts. Full accommodations for vehicular, bicycle, and pedestrian travel and upgraded signage and wayfinding will also be established to improve accessibility for all users who travel to and from the nearby businesses.

Source

(FFY) 2022

2023

2024

2025

2026

Total

Federal Funds

$12,248,900

---

---

---

---

$12,248,900

Non-Federal Funds

$3,062,225

---

---

---

---

$3,062,225

Total Funds

$15,311,125

---

---

---

---

$15,311,125

 

 

Acton: Intersection and Signal Improvements on Routes 2 and 111 (Massachusetts Avenue) at Piper Road and Taylor Road

Proponent:                MassDOT

ID Number:               607748

Project Type:             Safety Improvements

Cost:                          $4,382,329

Funding Source:        Statewide Highway Funds

Scoring Summary

This is a MassDOT-prioritized project and is therefore not directly evaluated using the MPO’s TIP scoring criteria.

Project Description

The project will make upgrades at the intersection to improve safety. The upgrades will include signs, pavement markings, and traffic signals as identified through a Road Safety Audit process in the Town of Acton.

Source

(FFY) 2022

2023

2024

2025

2026

Total

Federal Funds

---

---

---

---

$3,944,096

$3,944,096

Non-Federal Funds

---

---

---

---

$438,233

$438,233

Total Funds

---

---

---

---

$4,382,329

$4,382,329

 

 

Acton: Parking Management System

Proponent:                Acton

ID Number:               S12122

Project Type:             Community Connections

Cost:                          $20,000

Funding Source:        Regional Target Funds

Scoring Summary

This project received a total score of 29 points when evaluated using the criteria for the second round of the MPO’s Community Connections Program. These criteria differ from those used during the pilot round of this program in FFY 2021, as updates were made to the criteria based on the results of that pilot. These criteria are listed in Table A-5.

Project Description

This project will implement digital parking management products to improve the efficiency of permitting and enforcement processes at five commuter parking lots surrounding the MBTA South Acton commuter rail station. These highly utilized lots provide nearly 500 parking spaces. The project will support the transition from a paper-based parking management system to a cloud-based one that will be more convenient for commuters and Acton’s parking management team.

Source

(FFY) 2022

2023

2024

2025

2026

Total

Federal Funds

$16,000

---

---

---

---

$16,000

Non-Federal Funds

$4,000

---

---

---

---

$4,000

Total Funds

$20,000

---

---

---

---

$20,000

 

Acton, Boxborough, and Littleton: Pavement Preservation on Route 2

Proponent:                MassDOT

ID Number:               610722

Project Type:             Non-Interstate Pavement

Cost:                          $7,843,932

Funding Source:        Statewide Highway Funds

Scoring Summary

This is a MassDOT-prioritized project and is therefore not directly evaluated using the MPO’s TIP scoring criteria.

Project Description

This project includes pavement preservation work on Route 2 in Acton, Boxborough, and Littleton.

Source

(FFY) 2022

2023

2024

2025

2026

Total

Federal Funds

---

---

---

$6,275,146

---

$6,275,146

Non-Federal Funds

---

---

---

$1,568,786

---

$1,568,786

Total Funds

---

---

---

$7,843,932

---

$7,843,932

 

 

Arlington: Stratton School Improvements (SRTS)

Proponent:                Arlington

ID Number:               609531

Project Type:             Roadway Reconstruction

Cost:                          $1,072,752

Funding Source:        Statewide Highway Funds

Scoring Summary

This is a MassDOT-prioritized project and is therefore not directly evaluated using the MPO’s TIP scoring criteria.

Project Description

This project will make upgrades to promote safety along the roadways surrounding Stratton Elementary School in Arlington through the Safe Routes to School program.

Source

(FFY) 2022

2023

2024

2025

2026

Total

Federal Funds

---

---

$858,202

---

---

$858,202

Non-Federal Funds

---

---

$214,550

---

---

$214,550

Total Funds

---

---

$1,072,752

---

---

$1,072,752

 

 

Arlington, Newton, and Watertown: BlueBikes Expansion

Proponent:                Arlington, Newton, and Watertown

ID Number:               S12115

Project Type:             Community Connections

Cost:                          $340,000

Funding Source:        Regional Target Funds

Scoring Summary

This project received a total score of 52 points when evaluated using the criteria for the pilot round of the MPO’s Community Connections Program. These criteria are listed in Table A-14.

Project Description

This project will expand the regional BlueBikes bike share system in Arlington, Newton, and Watertown, adding nine new docking stations. This project is being coordinated in partnership with the Metropolitan Area Planning Council and Lyft. The principal goals of the project are to provide an alternative travel mode to promote a shift away from single-occupancy vehicles and to increase access to transit hubs, business districts, and academic institutions throughout these communities and the region.

Source

(FFY) 2022

2023

2024

2025

2026

Total

Federal Funds

$272,000

---

---

---

---

$272,000

Non-Federal Funds

$68,000

---

---

---

---

$68,000

Total Funds

$340,000

---

---

---

---

$340,000

 

 

Ashland: Bridge Replacement, A-14-006, Cordaville Road over Sudbury River

Proponent:                MassDOT

ID Number:               612099

Project Type:             Bridge

Cost:                          $4,107,096

Funding Source:        Statewide Highway Funds

Scoring Summary

This is a MassDOT-prioritized project and is therefore not directly evaluated using the MPO’s TIP scoring criteria.

Project Description

This project will replace bridge A-14-006, which carries Cordaville Road over the Sudbury River in Ashland.

Source

(FFY) 2022

2023

2024

2025

2026

Total

Federal Funds

---

---

---

---

$3,285,677

$3,285,677

Non-Federal Funds

---

---

---

---

$821,419

$821,419

Total Funds

---

---

---

---

$4,107,096

$4,107,096

 

 

Ashland: Rehabilitation and Rail Crossing Improvements on Cherry Street

Proponent:                Ashland

ID Number:               608436

Project Type:             Intersection Improvements

Cost:                          $1,269,327

Funding Source:        Regional Target Funds

Scoring Summary

Category

Safety

Sys Pres

CM/M

CA/SC

TE

EV

Total

Score

12 out of 30

10 out of 29

5 out of 29

2 out of 16

1 out of 12

8 out of 18

38 out of 134

Project Description

The primary purpose of the project is to improve the safety features for the roadway corridors of Cherry Street and Main Street in order to establish a Federal Railroad Administration Quiet Zone surrounding the railroad crossings on those two roadways. This goal will primarily be accomplished through the installation of roadway medians and the enhancement of existing railroad crossing signals and gates. In addition, the project addresses a critical gap in the pedestrian sidewalk network through the construction of new sidewalks. The project’s other goals include improving the existing roadway condition through pavement reconstruction and enhancing stormwater drainage in the project area.

Source

(FFY) 2022

2023

2024

2025

2026

Total

Federal Funds

---

---

$1,015,462

---

---

$1,015,462

Non-Federal Funds

---

---

$253,865

---

---

$253,865

Total Funds

---

---

$1,269,327

---

---

$1,269,327

 

 

Ayer and Littleton: Intersection Improvements on Route 2A at Willow Road and Bruce Street

Proponent:                MassDOT

ID Number:               608443

Project Type:             Intersection Improvements

Cost:                          $3,226,285

Funding Source:        Regional Target Funds

Scoring Summary

Category

Safety

Sys Pres

CM/M

CA/SC

TE

EV

Total

Score

17 out of 30

4 out of 29

9 out of 29

4 out of 16

1 out of 12

1 out of 18

36 out of 134

Project Description

The primary purpose of this project is to reduce angled collisions and improve the pavement condition of the intersection on Route 2A at Willow Road and Bruce Street. This goal will primarily be accomplished by reconstructing the skewed intersection and adding a new signal system. In addition, the project will also address safety for pedestrians and bicyclists through the provision of five-foot wide shoulders and the addition of crosswalks.

Source

(FFY) 2022

2023

2024

2025

2026

Total

Federal Funds

$2,581,028

---

---

---

---

$2,581,028

Non-Federal Funds

$645,257

---

---

---

---

$645,257

Total Funds

$3,226,285

---

---

---

---

$3,226,285

 

 

Bedford: Minuteman Bikeway Extension, from Loomis Street to the Concord Town Line

Proponent:                Bedford

ID Number:               607738

Project Type:             Bicycle and Pedestrian

Cost:                          $11,000,168

Funding Source:        Regional Target Funds

Scoring Summary

Category

Safety

Sys Pres

CM/M

CA/SC

TE

EV

Total

Score

7 out of 30

13 out of 29

15 out of 29

7 out of 16

1 out of 12

4 out of 18

47 out of 134

Project Description

The Minuteman Bikeway currently ends at Depot Park, in Bedford, near the intersection of South Road and Loomis Street. This project would extend the bikeway by making a 1,665 foot portion of Railroad Avenue accessible to bikes and by constructing 8,800 feet of bikeway on the Reformatory Branch Trail, from Railroad Avenue past Concord Road to Wheeler Drive, near the Bedford/Concord town line. The Railroad Avenue reconstruction will include new sidewalks, bicycle accommodations, drainage, pavement markings, signs, and defined curb cuts.

Source

(FFY) 2022

2023

2024

2025

2026

Total

Federal Funds

$8,800,134

---

---

---

---

$8,800,134

Non-Federal Funds

$2,200,034

---

---

---

---

$2,200,034

Total Funds

$11,000,168

---

---

---

---

$11,000,168

 

 

Bellingham: South Main Street (Route 126), from Mechanic Street (Route 140) to Douglas Drive

Proponent:                Bellingham

ID Number:               608887

Project Type:             Complete Streets

Cost:                          $6,398,158

Funding Source:        Regional Target Funds

Scoring Summary

Category

Safety

Sys Pres

CM/M

CA/SC

TE

EV

Total

Score

12 out of 30

12 out of 29

12 out of 29

5 out of 16

0 out of 12

4 out of 18

45 out of 134

Project Description

The primary purpose of this project is to improve the poor curb reveal, pavement condition and the lack of facilities for pedestrians and bicyclists. The project will include full-depth pavement reclamation and the reconstruction of existing sidewalks with five-foot shoulders to accommodate bicycle travel. In addition, pedestrian signal poles and intersection warning signage will be added to improve pedestrian safety and reduce rear-end collisions on Easy Street.

Source

(FFY) 2022

2023

2024

2025

2026

Total

Federal Funds

$5,118,526

---

---

---

---

$5,118,526

Non-Federal Funds

$1,279,632

---

---

---

---

$1,279,632

Total Funds

$6,398,158

---

---

---

---

$6,398,158

 

 

Beverly: Rehabilitation of Bridge Street

Proponent:                Beverly

ID Number:               608348

Project Type:             Complete Streets

Cost:                          $7,942,866

Funding Source:        Regional Target Funds

Scoring Summary

Category

Safety

Sys Pres

CM/M

CA/SC

TE

EV

Total

Score

13 out of 30

14 out of 29